Intrigue vs Mystery what difference

what is difference between Intrigue and Mystery

English

Alternative forms

  • entrigue

Etymology

Borrowed from French intrigue, from Italian intricare, from Latin intrīcō (I entangle, perplex, embarrass). Doublet of intricate.

Pronunciation

  • (noun) enPR: ĭn’trēg, IPA(key): /ˈɪntɹiːɡ/
  • (verb) enPR: ĭntrēg’, IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɹiːɡ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun

intrigue (countable and uncountable, plural intrigues)

  1. A complicated or clandestine plot or scheme intended to effect some purpose by secret artifice; conspiracy; stratagem.
    • [] lost in such a jungle of intrigues, pettifoggings, treacheries, diplomacies domestic and foreign []
  2. The plot of a play, poem or romance; the series of complications in which a writer involves their imaginary characters.
  3. Clandestine intercourse between persons; illicit intimacy; a liaison or affair.
    • 1976, John Harold Wilson, Court Satires of the Restoration (page 245)
      In 1679 and 1680 there were persistent rumors of an intrigue between Mary, Lady Grey, and the Duke of Monmouth.

Translations

Verb

intrigue (third-person singular simple present intrigues, present participle intriguing, simple past and past participle intrigued)

  1. (intransitive) To conceive or carry out a secret plan intended to harm; to form a plot or scheme.
  2. (transitive) To arouse the interest of; to fascinate.
  3. (intransitive) To have clandestine or illicit intercourse.
  4. (transitive) To fill with artifice and duplicity; to complicate.
    • c. 1681, John Scott, The Christian Life from its beginning to its Consummation in Glory []
      How doth it [sin] perplex and intrigue the whole course of your lives!

Translations

Related terms

  • intricacy
  • intricate
  • intriguer
  • intriguery
  • intriguing
  • intriguingly

References

  • intrigue in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • intrigue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.tʁiɡ/

Noun

intrigue f (plural intrigues)

  1. intrigue (all senses)

Verb

intrigue

  1. inflection of intriguer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “intrigue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ĩ.ˈtɾi.ɡi/

Verb

intrigue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of intrigar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of intrigar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of intrigar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of intrigar

Spanish

Verb

intrigue

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of intrigar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of intrigar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of intrigar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of intrigar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English mysterie, from Anglo-Norman misterie (Old French mistere), from Latin mysterium, from Ancient Greek μυστήριον (mustḗrion, a mystery, a secret, a secret rite), from μύστης (mústēs, initiated one), from μυέω (muéō, I initiate), from μύω (múō, I shut). Displaced native Old English ġerȳne.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mĭsʹtərē, mĭsʹtrē, IPA(key): /ˈmɪstəɹi/, /ˈmɪstɹi/
  • Hyphenation: mys‧te‧ry, myst‧ery

Noun

mystery (countable and uncountable, plural mysteries)

  1. Something secret or unexplainable; an unknown. [From XIV century.]
  2. Someone or something with an obscure or puzzling nature.
  3. (obsolete) A secret or mystical meaning. [From XIV century.]
    • 1567, Matteo Bandello, Certain Tragical Discourses of Bandello, tr. Geffraie Fenton:
      …and, not knowing the meaning or misterie of her pollicie, forgat no termes of reproche or rigorous rebuke against his chast doughter.
  4. A religious truth not understandable by the application of human reason alone (without divine aid). [From XIV century.]
    • 1744 (first printed), Jonathan Swift, A Sermon on the Trinity
      If God should please to reveal unto us this great mystery of the Trinity, or some other mysteries in our holy religion, we should not be able to understand them, unless he would bestow on us some new faculties of the mind.
  5. (archaic outside Eastern Orthodoxy) A sacrament. [From XV century.]
    • 1809, Sir Robert Ker Porter, Travelling Sketches in Russia and Sweden: During the Years 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808:
      There are seven mysteries, or sacraments, in the Greek church, viz. baptism, the chrism (a rite peculiar to this church), the eucharist, confession, ordination, marriage, and the holy oil.
  6. (chiefly in the plural) A secret religious celebration, admission to which was usually through initiation. [From XV century.]
  7. (Catholicism) A particular event or series of events in the life of Christ. [From XVII century.]
  8. A craft, art or trade; specifically a guild of craftsmen.
    • 1776, Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
      The trades, the crafts, the mysteries, would all be losers.

Synonyms

  • roun (obsolete)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Anglo-Norman misterie.

Noun

mystery

  1. Alternative form of mysterie (mystery)

Etymology 2

From Old French mistere.

Noun

mystery

  1. Alternative form of mysterie (duty)

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