Javelin vs Spear what difference

what is difference between Javelin and Spear

English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French javelline, diminutive of javelot, diminutive of *javel, from Vulgar Latin *gabalus, from Gaulish gabulum (compare Old Irish gabul (fork), Welsh gafl), from Proto-Celtic *gablā (fork, forked branch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeh₁bʰ-. The Old French term was also borrowed into Middle Low German as gaveline, and into Middle High German as gabilot. Cognate with gavelock, gaffle.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jăv’lǐn, IPA(key): /ˈdʒævlɪn/, /ˈdʒævəlɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ævlɪn

Noun

javelin (plural javelins)

  1. A light spear thrown with the hand and used as a weapon.
    • Flies the javelin swifter to its mark, / Launched by the vigour of a Roman arm?
  2. A metal-tipped spear thrown for distance in an athletic field event.

Derived terms

  • javelineer
  • javelinier

Translations

Verb

javelin (third-person singular simple present javelins, present participle javelining, simple past and past participle javelined)

  1. (transitive) To pierce with a javelin.

See also

  • discus
  • hammer


English

Etymology

From Middle English spere, sperre, spear, from Old English spere, from Proto-Germanic *speru (compare West Frisian spear, Dutch speer, German Speer, Old Norse spjǫr), related to *sparrô (compare Middle Dutch sparre (rafter), Old Norse sparri (spar, rafter), sperra (rafter, beam)), from Proto-Indo-European *sperH- (compare Latin sparus (short spear), Albanian ferrë (thorn, thornbush)). See park.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /spɪə̯(ɹ)/
  • (Canada, US) IPA(key): /spɪɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)

Noun

spear (plural spears)

  1. A long stick with a sharp tip used as a weapon for throwing or thrusting, or anything used to make a thrusting motion.
  2. (now chiefly historical) A soldier armed with such a weapon; a spearman.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 187:
      Two of the four spears came directly from Lady Margaret’s staff. One was her great-nephew Maurice St John […].
  3. A lance with barbed prongs, used by fishermen to retrieve fish.
  4. (ice hockey) An illegal maneuver using the end of a hockey stick to strike into another hockey player.
  5. (wrestling) In professional wrestling, a running tackle in which the wrestler’s shoulder is driven into the opponent’s midsection.
  6. A shoot, as of grass; a spire.
  7. The feather of a horse.
  8. The rod to which the bucket, or plunger, of a pump is attached; a pump rod.
  9. A long, thin strip from a vegetable.
    asparagus and broccoli spears

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • assegai, assagai, assagaie, assagay, assegay, azagaia, hassagay, hassaguay, zagaie, zagaye
  • atlatl
  • bayonet
  • harpoon
  • javelin
  • joust
  • lance
  • pike
  • spit, used to grill food on fire
  • woomera

Verb

spear (third-person singular simple present spears, present participle spearing, simple past and past participle speared)

  1. (transitive) To pierce with a spear.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To penetrate or strike with, or as if with, any long narrow object; to make a thrusting motion that catches an object on the tip of a long device.
    • 2003, Stan Fischler, Shirley Fischler, Who’s who in Hockey
      Former teammate Derek Sanderson recalls that Maki hit Ted from behind as Green was clearing the puck from the Boston zone. Green turned to knock Maki down, but Maki speared him as he rose from the ice.
  3. (gridiron football) To tackle an opponent by ramming into them with one’s helmet.
  4. (intransitive) To shoot into a long stem, as some plants do.

Translations

Adjective

spear (not comparable)

  1. Male.
    a spear counterpart
    • 2018, A Very English Scandal (TV series) (episode 1)
      When I was young, I was so desperate I’d go looking on the spear side.
  2. Pertaining to male family members.
    the spear side of the family

Antonyms

  • distaff

Anagrams

  • Asper, Earps, Pears, Peras, RESPA, Rapes, Spera, apers, apres, après, aprés, as per, asper, pares, parse, pears, prase, presa, præs., rapes, reaps, sarpe, spare

Middle English

Noun

spear

  1. Alternative form of spere (spear)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian spere, spiri, from Proto-Germanic *speru.

Noun

spear c (plural spearen, diminutive spearke)

  1. spear

Further reading

  • “spear”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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