Monologue vs Dialogue what difference

what is difference between Monologue and Dialogue

English

Alternative forms

  • monolog (US, noun)

Etymology

[circa 1550] From circa 1500 borrowing of Middle French monologue, modeled on dialogue, ultimately from Ancient Greek or via Byzantine Greek μονόλογος (monólogos, speaking alone).

Noun

monologue (plural monologues)

  1. (drama, authorship) A long speech by one person in a play; sometimes a soliloquy; other times spoken to other characters.
  2. (comedy) A long series of comic stories and jokes as an entertainment.
  3. A long, uninterrupted utterance that monopolizes a conversation.

Synonyms

  • (drama): soliloquy

Antonyms

  • (a monopolizing utterance): dialogue

Translations

See also

  • soliloquy

Verb

monologue (third-person singular simple present monologues, present participle monologuing, simple past and past participle monologued)

  1. To deliver a monologue.
    • 1989, Oliver Sacks, Seeing Voices
      Powerful parents, in her formulation, feeling themselves autonomous and powerful, give autonomy and power to their children; powerless ones, feeling themselves passive and controlled, in turn exert an excessive control on their children, and monologue at them, instead of having a dialogue with them.

Synonyms

  • monologize

Derived terms

  • monologic / monological
  • monologuist

French

Etymology

Modeled on dialogue, ultimately from Ancient Greek or via Byzantine Greek μονόλογος (monólogos).

Pronunciation

Noun

monologue m (plural monologues)

  1. monologue

Verb

monologue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of monologuer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of monologuer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of monologuer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of monologuer
  5. second-person singular imperative of monologuer

Further reading

  • “monologue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Noun

monologue m (plural monologues)

  1. soliloquy; monologue

Portuguese

Verb

monologue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of monologar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of monologar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of monologar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of monologar

Spanish

Verb

monologue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of monologar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of monologar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of monologar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of monologar.


English

Alternative forms

  • (US): dialog

Etymology

From Middle English dialog, from Old French dialoge (French dialogue), from Late Latin dialogus, from Ancient Greek διάλογος (diálogos, conversation, discourse), from διά (diá, through, inter) + λόγος (lógos, speech, oration, discourse), from διαλέγομαι (dialégomai, to converse), from διά (diá) + λέγειν (légein, to speak).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdaɪəlɒɡ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdaɪəlɔɡ/
  • (US, Canada, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /ˈdaɪəlɑɡ/
  • (US)

Noun

dialogue (countable and uncountable, plural dialogues)

  1. A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.
    • 2013, Paul Harris, Lance Armstrong faces multi-million dollar legal challenges after confession (in The Guardian, 19 January 2013)[1]
      The hours of dialogue with Winfrey, which culminated in a choked-up moment on Friday night as he discussed the impact of his cheating on his family, appear to have failed to give Armstrong the redemption that he craves.
  2. (authorship) In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.
  3. (philosophy) A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.
  4. (computing) A dialogue box.

See also

  • introspection
  • monologue
  • trialogue
  • quadralogue
  • multilogue

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • dialect
  • dialectic

Translations

References

  • Dialogue on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

dialogue (third-person singular simple present dialogues, present participle dialoguing, simple past and past participle dialogued)

  1. (informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.
  2. (transitive) To put into dialogue form.
  3. (obsolete) To take part in a dialogue; to dialogize.

Translations


French

Etymology

From Late Latin dialogus, from Ancient Greek διάλογος (diálogos, conversation, discourse), from διά (diá, through, inter) + λόγος (lógos, speech, oration, discourse), from διαλέγομαι (dialégomai, to converse), from διά (diá) + λέγειν (légein, to speak).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dja.lɔɡ/

Noun

dialogue m (plural dialogues)

  1. dialogue

Derived terms

  • dialogue de sourds

Verb

dialogue

  1. inflection of dialoguer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Descendants

  • Turkish: diyalog

Further reading

  • “dialogue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Spanish

Verb

dialogue

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dialogar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dialogar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of dialogar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dialogar.

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