Mosaic vs Collage what difference

what is difference between Mosaic and Collage

English

Alternative forms

  • mosaick (obsolete)
  • musaic (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle French mosaïque, from Italian mosaico, from Medieval Latin musaicum, from Late Latin musivum (opus), from Latin museum, musaeum, probably from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon), shrine of the Muses (Μοῦσα (Moûsa)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /məʊˈzeɪk/, /məʊˈzeɪ.ɪk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /moʊˈzeɪ.ɪk/, /moʊˈzeɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk, -eɪɪk

Noun

mosaic (countable and uncountable, plural mosaics)

  1. A piece of artwork created by placing colored squares (usually tiles) in a pattern so as to create a picture.
  2. (genetics) An individual composed of two or more cell lines of different genetic or chromosomal constitution, but from the same zygote.
  3. (phytopathology) Any of several viral diseases that cause mosaic-like patterns to appear on leaves.
  4. A composite picture made from overlapping photographs.

Derived terms

  • mosaicist

Translations

Adjective

mosaic (not comparable)

  1. (of an individual) Containing cells of varying genetic constitution.

Related terms

  • alphamosaic
  • mosaicism
  • mosaicist
  • photomosaic

See also

  • intarsia
  • mosaic on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mosaic (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • Redslob, Gustav Moritz (1860) , “Über den Ausdruck „Mosaïk“”, in Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft, volume 14, pages 663–678

Anagrams

  • Amicos, Samoic

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /moˈzajk/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /muˈzajk/

Noun

mosaic m (plural mosaics)

  1. mosaic

Friulian

Noun

mosaic m (plural mosaics)

  1. mosaic


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French collage.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kɒˈlɑːʒ/, /kəˈlɑːʒ/, /ˈkɒl.ɑːʒ/
  • (US) enPR: kə-läzh’, kō-läzh’, IPA(key): /kəˈlɑʒ/, /koʊˈlɑʒ/
  • ,

Noun

collage (countable and uncountable, plural collages)

  1. A picture made by sticking other pictures onto a surface.
  2. A composite object or collection (abstract or concrete) created by the assemblage of various media; especially for a work of art such as text, film, etc.
    • “Richard Brautigan’s novel So the Wind Won’t Blow It All Away is a collage of memories.”
  3. (uncountable) The technique of producing a work of art of this kind.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • montage
  • papier-mâché
  • pastiche
  • decoupage

Verb

collage (third-person singular simple present collages, present participle collaging, simple past and past participle collaged)

  1. (transitive) To make into a collage.

See also

  • collage on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • collage on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • alcogel

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French collage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌkɔˈlaː.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: col‧la‧ge
  • Rhymes: -aːʒə

Noun

collage m (plural collages)

  1. collage (image created by placing pictures on a surface)
  2. collage (composite created by the assemblage of various works)

Derived terms

  • herfstcollage

Related terms

  • col

French

Etymology

From coller +‎ -age.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.laʒ/

Noun

collage m (plural collages)

  1. collage
  2. (photography) montage

Descendants

  • Dutch: collage
  • English: collage
  • Russian: колла́ж (kolláž) (see there for further descendants)

Further reading

  • “collage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

collage

  1. Alternative form of college

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French collage.

Noun

collage m (plural collages)

  1. collage

Further reading

  • “collage” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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