Mucus vs Sputum what difference

what is difference between Mucus and Sputum

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin mūcus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmjuːkəs/
  • Rhymes: -uːkəs
  • Hyphenation: mu‧cus
  • Homophone: mucous

Noun

mucus (usually uncountable, plural mucuses or muci)

  1. (physiology) A slippery secretion from the lining of the mucous membranes.

Usage notes

Do not confuse mucous (adjective) with mucus (noun).

Hyponyms

  • phlegm
  • rheum

Derived terms

Related terms

  • mucosa
  • mucositis

Translations

See also

  • snot

Anagrams

  • CUSUM

French

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from Latin mūcus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /my.kys/

Noun

mucus m (uncountable)

  1. (physiology) mucus

Further reading

  • “mucus” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Alternative forms

  • muccus

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *moukos, from Proto-Indo-European *mew-k- (slimy, slippery). Cognates include Ancient Greek μύκης (múkēs, mushroom).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈmuː.kus/, [ˈmuːkʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈmu.kus/, [ˈmuːkus]

Noun

mūcus m (genitive mūcī); second declension

  1. mucus

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • mūcēdō
  • muceō
  • mūcidus
  • mūcōsus
  • mūculentus

Related terms

  • mūcō

Descendants

References

  • mucus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mucus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mucus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mucus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin mucus. Doublet of muc.

Noun

mucus n (uncountable)

  1. mucus

Declension



English

Etymology

From New Latin, from Latin sputum (that which is spit out, spittle), from spuere (to spit).

Noun

sputum (countable and uncountable, plural sputa)

  1. (physiology) Matter coughed up and expectorated from the mouth, composed of saliva and discharges from the respiratory passages such as mucus, phlegm or pus.

Translations

Further reading

  • sputum on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • sputum in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sputum in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • sputum at OneLook Dictionary Search

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈspuːtum]
  • Hyphenation: spu‧tum

Noun

sputum n

  1. sputum

Declension

Synonyms

  • chrchel m
  • hlen m

Further reading

  • sputum in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sputum in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Indonesian

Etymology

Learned borrowing from Latin sputum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsputʊm]
  • Hyphenation: spu‧tum

Noun

sputum (first-person possessive sputumku, second-person possessive sputummu, third-person possessive sputumnya)

  1. (medicine) sputum.
    Synonyms: balgam, dahak

Further reading

  • “sputum” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Latin

Etymology

From spuō.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈspuː.tum/, [ˈs̠puːt̪ʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈspu.tum/, [ˈspuːt̪um]

Noun

spūtum n (genitive spūtī); second declension

  1. spittle

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Related terms

  • sputō

Descendants

Participle

spūtum

  1. inflection of spūtus:
    1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular
    2. accusative masculine singular

References

  • sputum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sputum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sputum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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