Nepotism vs Cronyism what difference

what is difference between Nepotism and Cronyism

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French népotisme, from Italian nepotismo, from Latin nepōs (nephew), a reference to the practice of popes appointing relatives (most often nephews) as cardinals during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /ˈnɛp.ə.tɪ.zəm/

Noun

nepotism (countable and uncountable, plural nepotisms)

  1. The favoring of relatives or personal friends because of their relationship rather than because of their abilities.
    Antonyms: meritocracy, merit system
    Coordinate term: cronyism
    • 1989, Report on Business Magazine (volume 6, issues 1-6, page 100)
      Now retailers even demand deslotting or failure fees, a penalty for trial products that fail to meet their sales objectives. The struggle over display space heavily favors the incumbents and encourages what might be called brand nepotism.

Related terms

  • nepotistic
  • nepotistical

Translations

Further reading

  • nepotism on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • pimentos

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French népotisme.

Noun

nepotism n (uncountable)

  1. nepotism

Related terms

  • nepot
  • nepoată
  • nepoțel
  • nepoțică
  • nepoție


English

Etymology

crony +‎ -ism

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɹəʊ.ni.ɪ.zəm/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɹoʊ.ni.ɪ.zəm/

Noun

cronyism (countable and uncountable, plural cronyisms)

  1. Favoritism to friends without regard for their qualifications, especially by appointing them to political positions.
    Coordinate terms: nepotism, patronage
    • 2013, Randall G. Holcombe and Andrea M. Castillo, Liberalism and Cronyism: Two Rival Political and Economic Systems, Mercatus Center at George Mason University (→ISBN)
      Because of this centralized command structure, communist societies fall prey to the forces of cronyism and influence-peddling as commune members without economic power curry favor with commune leaders that control access to resources.
    • 2015, Thomas J. Gradel, Dick Simpson, Corrupt Illinois: Patronage, Cronyism, and Criminality, University of Illinois Press (→ISBN), page 117:
      Patronage, nepotism, cronyism, abuse of power, and criminal activity flourish, sometimes for decades, in numerous town halls, police stations, and special-purpose government agencies in the suburbs.

Translations

References

  • “cronyism”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • crimsony

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