Occasionally vs Often what difference

what is difference between Occasionally and Often

English

Etymology

From occasional +‎ -ly.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əˈkeɪʒənəli/, /əˈkeɪʒnəli/, /əˈkeɪʒənli/
  • Hyphenation: oc‧ca‧sion‧al‧ly, oc‧casi‧onal‧ly, oc‧casion‧ally

Adverb

occasionally (comparative more occasionally, superlative most occasionally)

  1. (obsolete) On the occasion of something else happening; incidentally, by the way. [15th–18th c.]
    • 1619, John Richardson, John Toland, The canon of the New Testament Vindicated, page 30
      I think it is plain, that Origen, whatever Character he may have occaſionally given of this Book, did not judge it any part of the Canon
  2. From time to time; sometimes; at relatively infrequent intervals. [from 15th c.]
    Synonyms: now and then, once in a while
    • 1639, Henry Ainsworth, Annotations Upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalmes and the Song of Songs, page 177.
      God ſetteth no houres for the morning or evening ſacrifice because they may occaſionally be changed.
    • 1855, Horace Mann, “On the Statistical Position of Religious Bodies in England and Wales,” Journal of the Statistical Society of London, vol. 18, no. 2, p. 152,
      Some perhaps worship only on alternate Sundays; others still more occasionally.
    • 1978, Stephen R. Graubard, “Twenty Years of ‘Daedalus’,” Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, vol. 32, no. 3, p. 18,
      The journal, more occasionally, has turned to what might be called “fashionable” themes.
    • 2007, Matt Gouras/AP, “Wildfires Rage in Montana,” Time, 17 Aug,
      Flames could still be seen from town flaring up occasionally on a hill dotted with emergency vehicles.
      depends, QC Gang, How occasionally is ur dog?
  3. (obsolete) By chance; accidentally. [17th–18th c.]
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 161:
      Mr Tourville occasionally told his age; just turned of thirty-one.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. III, ch. 81:
      [N]othing gave him so much joy in conversation, as an opportunity of giving the company to understand, how well he was with persons of distinguished rank and character: he would often (for example) observe, as it were occasionally, that the duke of G— was one of the best natured men in the world [] .
    • 1790, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer (Journals 1789–1795), Yale 1989, p. 103:
      I had met Lord Ossory in the forenoon, who had come to town occasionally.

Synonyms

  • on occasion, sometimes, at times, now and then

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English often, alteration (with final -n added due to analogy with Middle English selden (seldom)) of Middle English ofte, oft, from Old English oft (oft; often), from Proto-Germanic *ufta, *uftō (often). Cognate with Scots oftin (often), North Frisian oftem (often), Saterland Frisian oafte (often), German oft (often), Norwegian and Danish ofte (often), Swedish ofta (often), Icelandic oft (often).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒf(t)ən/, (East Anglia, Historical RP) /ˈɔːf(t)ən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔf(t)ən/
  • (US, cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈɑf(t)ən/
  • Rhymes: -ɒfən, -ɒftən
  • Homophone: orphan (non-rhotic accents with the lot–cloth split)
  • Hyphenation: of‧ten
  • Historically, the /t/ was pronounced, but the current pronunciation was standardized after it stopped being pronounced. Therefore, the modern forms where the /t/ is pronounced (compare oft) are spelling-influenced pronunciations. The traditional /t/-less form is for that reason considered by many to be “more correct”.

Adverb

often (comparative more often or oftener, superlative most often or oftenest)

  1. Frequently, many times.

Synonyms

  • a lot
  • frequently
  • usually

Antonyms

  • infrequently
  • occasionally
  • rarely
  • seldom

Derived terms

  • as often as not
  • oftenness

Related terms

  • oftentimes
  • oft

Translations

Adjective

often (comparative more often, superlative most often)

  1. (archaic) Frequent.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act IV, Scene 1,[2]
      [] it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and, indeed, the sundry contemplation of my travels; in which my often rumination wraps me in a most humorous sadness.
    • 1618, Anthony Munday (translator), The Third Booke of Amadis de Gaule by Nicolas de Herberay des Essarts (1542), London, Chapter 2, p. 18,[3]
      Then came the Ladies to visite him, and the Queene gaue him most gracious welcome, desiring him to be of good cheere: For heere is my Daughter (quoth she) right skilfull in the Art of Chirurgerie, that meanes to bee your often visitant.
    • 1656, John Bunyan, Solomon’s Temple Spiritualiz’d, London: George Larkin, 1688, Chapter 48, p. 113,[4]
      The Shew-bread by an often remove, and renewing, was continually to stand before the Lord in his House []

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