Opposite vs Contrast what difference

what is difference between Opposite and Contrast

English

Alternative forms

  • opposit (archaic)

Etymology

From Old French oposite, from Latin oppositus, perfect passive participle of oppōnō (I oppose). Compare oppose.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒpəzɪt/, /ˈɒpəsɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑp(ə)sɪt/, /ˈɑpəzɪt/

Adjective

opposite (not comparable)

  1. Located directly across from something else, or from each other.
    She saw him walking on the opposite side of the road.
  2. (botany) Of leaves and flowers, positioned directly across from each other on a stem.
  3. Facing in the other direction.
    They were moving in opposite directions.
  4. Of either of two complementary or mutually exclusive things.
    He is attracted to the opposite sex.
  5. Extremely different; inconsistent; contrary; repugnant; antagonistic.
    • Novels, by which the reader is misled into another sort of pieasure opposite to that which is designed in an epick poem.
    • , Book III
      Particles of speech have divers, and sometimes almost opposite, significations.

Derived terms

  • opposite sex

Translations

Noun

opposite (plural opposites)

  1. Something opposite or contrary to something else.
  2. A person or thing that is entirely different from or the reverse of someone or something else; used to show contrast between two people or two things.
    She is the opposite of her ex-boyfriend who abused her both physically and verbally nearly every day for five years. She now works as an advocate and supportive listener for others who have endured abusive relationships.
  3. An opponent.
  4. An antonym.
    “Up” is the opposite of “down”.
  5. (mathematics) An additive inverse.

Derived terms

  • opposites attract
  • polar opposite

Translations

Adverb

opposite (not comparable)

  1. In an opposite position.
    I was on my seat and she stood opposite.
    Where’s the bus station? -Over there, just opposite.

Translations

Preposition

opposite

  1. Facing, or across from.
    • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. []. He halted opposite the Privy Gardens, and, with his face turned skywards, listened until the sound of the Tower guns smote again on the ear and dispelled his doubts.
  2. In a complementary role to.
  3. (television) On another channel at the same time.
    The game show Just Men! aired opposite The Young and the Restless on CBS.

Translations

See also

  • apposite

Latin

Adjective

opposite

  1. vocative masculine singular of oppositus

References

  • opposite in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Middle French

Adjective

opposite m or f (plural opposites)

  1. opposite (located directly across from something else, or from each other)

Noun

opposite f (plural opposites)

  1. opposite side

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (opposeur)


English

Etymology

From French contraster, from Italian contrastare (to resist”, “to withstand), from Vulgar Latin *contrāstāre, from Latin contrā (against) + stō, stāre (to stand)

Pronunciation

  • (noun)
    (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒntɹɑːst/
    (US) enPR: kŏn’trăst, IPA(key): /ˈkɑnt(ʃ)ɹæst/
  • (verb)
    (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈtɹɑːst/

    (US) enPR: kəntrăst’, kŏn’trăst, IPA(key): /kənˈt(ʃ)ɹæst/, /ˈkɑnt(ʃ)ɹæst/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːst

Noun

contrast (countable and uncountable, plural contrasts)

  1. (countable) A difference in lightness, brightness and/or hue between two colours that makes them more or less distinguishable.
    1. (uncountable) The degree of this difference.
    2. (countable) A control on a television, etc, that adjusts the amount of contrast in the images being displayed.
  2. (countable) A difference between two objects, people or concepts.
    • The colonel and his sponsor made a queer contrast: Greystone [the sponsor] long and stringy, with a face that seemed as if a cold wind was eternally playing on it.
  3. (countable, uncountable, rhetoric) Antithesis.

Derived terms

  • metacontrast
  • paracontrast

Translations

Verb

contrast (third-person singular simple present contrasts, present participle contrasting, simple past and past participle contrasted)

  1. (transitive) To set in opposition in order to show the difference or differences between.
  2. (intransitive) To form a contrast.
    • 1845, Charles Lyell, Lyell’s Travels in North America
      The joints which divide the sandstone contrast finely with the divisional planes which separate the basalt into pillars.

Derived terms

  • contrasting
  • contrastive

Translations

See also

  • compare

Catalan

Etymology

From contrastar, attested from the 14th century.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /konˈtɾast/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /kunˈtɾast/

Noun

contrast m (plural contrasts or contrastos)

  1. contrast

References

Further reading

  • “contrast” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “contrast” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “contrast” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French contraste, from Middle French contraste, from Italian contrasto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔnˈtrɑst/
  • Hyphenation: con‧trast
  • Rhymes: -ɑst

Noun

contrast n (plural contrasten, diminutive contrastje n)

  1. A contrast.
    Synonym: tegenstelling

Related terms

  • contrasteren

Romanian

Etymology

From French contraste.

Noun

contrast n (plural contraste)

  1. contrast

Declension


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