Oval vs Circle what difference

what is difference between Oval and Circle

English

Etymology

From Late Latin ovalis, from ovum; cognate with French and Italian ovale, Dutch ovaal. From 1570.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈəʊvəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈoʊvəl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊvəl

Noun

oval (plural ovals)

  1. An elongated round shape resembling an egg or ellipse.
  2. A thing having such a shape, such as an arena.
  3. (mathematics) In a projective plane, a set of points such that no three are collinear and there is a unique tangent line at each point.
  4. (Australia) A sports field, typically but not exclusively oval in shape.

Derived terms

  • hyperoval
  • roval

Translations

Adjective

oval (comparative more oval, superlative most oval)

  1. Having the shape of an oval.
  2. Of or pertaining to an ovum.
    oval conceptions

Synonyms

  • ovular, ovate, ovoid, ovaline, elliptical, egg-shaped

Usage notes

Any of the English adjectives derived from Latin ovum (including oval, ovate, ovoid) are typically considered synonymous when referring to egg-like shapes where one end is wider than the other but, out of all of them, oval is the most likely to be used in reference to a symmetrical ellipse.

Derived terms

  • bioval
  • circumoval
  • ovaline
  • ovalish
  • ovally
  • perioval
  • plurioval
  • monoval
  • unioval

Translations

See also

  • ovoid
  • ovum

Anagrams

  • vola

Asturian

Adjective

oval (epicene, plural ovales)

  1. oval (oval-shaped)

Synonyms

  • ovaláu

Catalan

Etymology

ou +‎ -al

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /oˈval/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /uˈbal/

Adjective

oval (masculine and feminine plural ovals)

  1. oval
    Synonym: ovalat

Noun

oval m (plural ovals)

  1. oval

Related terms

  • ovoide

Further reading

  • “oval” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “oval” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “oval” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “oval” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

oval (comparative ovaler, superlative am ovalsten)

  1. oval

Synonyms

  • eiförmig
  • eirund

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin ovalis, from ovum (egg)

Adjective

oval (neuter singular ovalt, definite singular and plural ovale)

  1. oval

Noun

oval m (definite singular ovalen, indefinite plural ovaler, definite plural ovalene)

  1. an oval

Derived terms

  • ovalformet

References

  • “oval” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin ovalis, from ovum (egg)

Adjective

oval (neuter singular ovalt, definite singular and plural ovale)

  1. oval

Noun

oval m (definite singular ovalen, indefinite plural ovalar, definite plural ovalane)

  1. an oval

References

  • “oval” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Adjective

oval m or f (plural ovais, comparable)

  1. oval (shaped like an egg)
    Synonyms: ovalado, ovoide

Romanian

Etymology

From French ovale

Adjective

oval m or n (feminine singular ovală, masculine plural ovali, feminine and neuter plural ovale)

  1. oval

Declension


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oˈbal/, [oˈβ̞al]

Adjective

oval (plural ovales)

  1. oval (shaped like an oval)
    Synonym: ovalado

Related terms

  • óvalo
  • ovoide
  • ovalado
  • huevo

Further reading

  • “oval” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From Middle English circle, cercle, from Old French cercle and Latin circulus, diminutive of Latin circus (circle, circus), from Ancient Greek κίρκος (kírkos, circle, ring), related to Old English hring (ring). Compare also Old English ċircul (circle, zodiac), which came from the same Latin source.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sûrʹ-kəl, IPA(key): /ˈsɜɹkəl/
    • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈsɜː.kəɫ]
    • (US) IPA(key): [ˈsɝ.kəɫ]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)kəl
  • Homophone: cercal
  • Hyphenation: cir‧cle

Noun

circle (plural circles)

  1. (geometry) A two-dimensional geometric figure, a line, consisting of the set of all those points in a plane that are equally distant from a given point (center).
    Synonyms: (not in mathematical use) coil, (not in mathematical use) ring, (not in mathematical use) loop
  2. A two-dimensional geometric figure, a disk, consisting of the set of all those points of a plane at a distance less than or equal to a fixed distance (radius) from a given point.
    Synonyms: disc, (in mathematical and general use) disk, (not in mathematical use; UK & Commonwealth only) round
  3. Any shape, curve or arrangement of objects that approximates to or resembles the geometric figures.
    Children, please join hands and form a circle.
    1. Any thin three-dimensional equivalent of the geometric figures.
    2. A curve that more or less forms part or all of a circle.
  4. A specific group of persons; especially one who shares a common interest.
    Synonyms: bunch, gang, group
    • At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    • “I don’t mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, [], the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!”
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles.
  5. The orbit of an astronomical body.
  6. (cricket) A line comprising two semicircles of 30 yards radius centred on the wickets joined by straight lines parallel to the pitch used to enforce field restrictions in a one-day match.
  7. (Wicca) A ritual circle that is cast three times deosil and closes three times widdershins either in the air with a wand or literally with stones or other items used for worship.
  8. (South Africa) A traffic circle or roundabout.
  9. (obsolete) Compass; circuit; enclosure.
  10. (astronomy) An instrument of observation, whose graduated limb consists of an entire circle. When fixed to a wall in an observatory, it is called a mural circle; when mounted with a telescope on an axis and in Y’s, in the plane of the meridian, a meridian or transit circle; when involving the principle of reflection, like the sextant, a reflecting circle; and when that of repeating an angle several times continuously along the graduated limb, a repeating circle.
  11. A series ending where it begins, and repeating itself.
    • Thus in a circle runs the peasant’s pain.
  12. (logic) A form of argument in which two or more unproved statements are used to prove each other; inconclusive reasoning.
    • 1661, Joseph Glanvill, The Vanity of Dogmatizing
      That heavy bodies descend by gravity; and, again, that gravity is a quality whereby a heavy body descends, is an impertinent circle and teaches nothing.
  13. Indirect form of words; circumlocution.
    • 1610, Ben Jonson, The Alchemist
      Has he given the lie, / In circle, or oblique, or semicircle.
  14. A territorial division or district.
  15. (in the plural) A bagginess of the skin below the eyes from lack of sleep.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • circular
  • circulate
  • circus

Descendants

  • Pitcairn-Norfolk: sirkil

Translations

Verb

circle (third-person singular simple present circles, present participle circling, simple past and past participle circled)

  1. (transitive) To travel around along a curved path.
    The wolves circled the herd of deer.
  2. (transitive) To surround.
    A high fence circles the enclosure.
    • 1699, William Dampier, Voyages and Descriptions
      Their heads are circled with a short turban.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Dungeon
      So he lies, circled with evil.
  3. (transitive) To place or mark a circle around.
    Circle the jobs that you are interested in applying for.
  4. (intransitive) To travel in circles.
    Vultures circled overhead.

Derived terms

  • circle the drain

Translations

Anagrams

  • cleric

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