Pose vs Poise what difference

what is difference between Pose and Poise

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /poʊz/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pəʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Etymology 1

From Middle English pose, from Old English ġeposu pl (cold in the head; catarrh, literally (the) sneezes; (the) snorts), from Old English pos, ġepos (sneeze, snort), from Proto-Germanic *pusą (sneeze, snort), from Proto-Germanic *pusōną, *pusjaną (to snort, blow), from Proto-Indo-European *bew- (to blow, swell). Compare Low German pusten (to blow, puff), German dialectal pfausen (to sneeze, snort), Norwegian dialectal pysa (to blow).

Noun

pose (plural poses)

  1. (archaic) Common cold, head cold; catarrh.
    • 1586, William Harrison, A Description of England
      Now [] have we many chimnies, and yet our tenderlings complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses.
    • 1825, Robert Herrick, The poetical works of Robert Herrick:
      Megg yesterday was troubled with a pose, Which, this night hardned, sodders up her nose.
    • 1903, Thomas Heywood, Lucian (of Samosata.), Desiderius Erasmus, Pleasant Dialogues and Dramma’s
      The Ague, Cough, the Pyony, the Pose. Aches within, and accidents without, […]
    • 2009, Eucharius Rösslin, Thomas Raynalde, Elaine Hobby, The Birth of Mankind
      And whereas some say, that they which use oft washing of their heads shall be very prone to headache, that is not true, but only in such that, after they have been washed, roll up their hair (being yet wet) about their heads; the cold whereof is dangerous to bring them to catarrhs and poses, with other inconveniences.

Etymology 2

From Middle English posen, from Old French poser (to put, place, stell, settle, lodge), from Vulgar Latin pausāre (to blin, cease, pause), from Latin pausa (pause), from Ancient Greek παῦσις (paûsis); influenced by Latin pōnere. Doublet of pause.

Verb

pose (third-person singular simple present poses, present participle posing, simple past and past participle posed)

  1. (transitive) To place in an attitude or fixed position, for the sake of effect.
  2. (transitive) To ask; to set (a test, quiz, riddle, etc.).
  3. (transitive) To constitute (a danger, a threat, a risk, etc.).
    • 2010, Noam Chomsky, The Iranian threat, Z Magazine, vol 23, number 7:
      Rather, they are concerned with the threat Iran poses to the region and the world.
    • 2014, Ian Black, “Courts kept busy as Jordan works to crush support for Isis”, The Guardian, 27 November 2014:
      The threat the most radical of them pose is evidently far greater at home than abroad.
  4. (transitive, in the phrase “to pose as”) To falsely impersonate (another person or occupation) primarily for the purpose of accomplishing something or reaching a goal.
  5. (intransitive) To assume or maintain a pose; to strike an attitude.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, A Shabby Genteel Story
      He [] posed before her as a hero.
  6. (intransitive) To behave affectedly in order to attract interest or admiration.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To interrogate; to question.
    • She pretended to [] pose him and sift him.
  8. (obsolete, transitive) To question with a view to puzzling; to embarrass by questioning or scrutiny; to bring to a stand.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of the Love of God (sermon)
      A question wherewith a learned Pharisee thought to pose or puzzle him.
Translations

Noun

pose (plural poses)

  1. Position, posture, arrangement (especially of the human body).
  2. Affectation.
Derived terms
  • cool pose
  • posable
  • posing pouch
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English posen, a combination of aphetic forms of Middle English aposen and opposen. More at appose, oppose.

Alternative forms

  • poze

Verb

pose (third-person singular simple present poses, present participle posing, simple past and past participle posed)

  1. (obsolete) To ask (someone) questions; to interrogate.
    • 1526, William Tyndale (translator), Bible, Luke 2
      And hit fortuned that after .iii. dayes, they founde hym in the temple sittinge in the middes of the doctours, both hearynge them, and posinge them.
    • 1643, Thomas Browne, Religio Medici, I.9
      ‘Tis my solitary recreation to pose my apprehension with those involved Ænigmas and riddles of the Trinity, with Incarnation and Resurrection.
  2. (now rare) to puzzle, non-plus, or embarrass with difficult questions.
  3. (now rare) To perplex or confuse (someone).
Derived terms
  • poser

Further reading

  • pose in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pose in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pose at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • ESOP, PEOs, epos, opes, peos, peso, poes, sope

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse posi, from Proto-Germanic *pusô.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [ˈpʰoːsə]

Noun

pose

  1. bag

Usage notes

Do not fail to perceive the distinction between this, being a simple, one-room container open or openable in the top, and a taske.

Inflection

References

  • “pose” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French pose.

Pronunciation

Hyphenation: po‧se

Noun

pose f (plural posen or poses, diminutive posetje n)

  1. stance or pose

Anagrams

  • epos, poes, soep

Finnish

Noun

pose

  1. (slang) jail

Declension

Anagrams

  • peso

French

Etymology

Derived from the verb poser. Compare also Italian posa, Latin pausa.

Noun

pose f (plural poses)

  1. installation

Derived terms

  • prendre la pose

Noun

pose m (plural poses)

  1. extension (in telecommunications)

Descendants

  • Romanian: poză

Verb

pose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of poser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of poser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of poser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of poser
  5. second-person singular imperative of poser

Further reading

  • “pose” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Ido

Adverb

pose

  1. afterwards

Italian

Pronunciation

  • póse, IPA(key): /ˈpose/

Verb

pose

  1. third-person singular past historic of porre

Anagrams

  • peso, pesò

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse posi

Noun

pose m (definite singular posen, indefinite plural poser, definite plural posene)

  1. bag, sack

Derived terms

References

  • “pose” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse posi.

Noun

pose m (definite singular posen, indefinite plural posar, definite plural posane)

  1. a bag or sack

Derived terms

  • papirpose
  • plastpose
  • sovepose
  • tepose

References

  • “pose” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Pali

Alternative forms

Noun

pose

  1. inflection of posa (man):
    1. locative singular
    2. accusative plural

Spanish

Verb

pose

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of posar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of posar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of posar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of posar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English poys, poyse, from Anglo-Norman pois, Middle French pois (weight) and Anglo-Norman poise, Middle French poise (measure of weight), from Latin pēnsāre (to ponder, weight, think).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: poyz, IPA(key): /pɔɪz/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪz

Noun

poise (countable and uncountable, plural poises)

  1. A state of balance, equilibrium or stability.
    • plants and animals, which are all made up of and nourished by water, and perhaps never return to water again, do not keep things at a poise
  2. Composure; freedom from embarrassment or affectation.
  3. Mien; bearing or deportment of the head or body.
  4. A condition of hovering, or being suspended.
  5. (physics) A CGS unit of dynamic viscosity equal to one dyne-second per square centimetre.
  6. (obsolete) Weight; an amount of weight, the amount something weighs.
  7. The weight, or mass of metal, used in weighing, to balance the substance weighed.
  8. That which causes a balance; a counterweight.
    • 1677, John Dryden, The State of Innocence
      Men of an unbounded imagination [] often wanted the poise of judgment.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • peso
  • pansy
  • pensive
  • avoirdupois

Translations

Verb

poise (third-person singular simple present poises, present participle poising, simple past and past participle poised)

  1. (obsolete) To hang in equilibrium; to be balanced or suspended; hence, to be in suspense or doubt.
    • 1850, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Seaside and the Fireside
      The slender, graceful spars / Poise aloft in the air.
  2. (obsolete) To counterpoise; to counterbalance.
    • 1699, John Dryden, Epistle to John Dryden
      to poise with solid sense a sprightly wit
  3. (obsolete) To be of a given weight; to weigh. [14th-17th c.]
  4. (obsolete) To add weight to, to weigh down. [16th-18th c.]
  5. (now rare) To hold (something) with or against something else in equilibrium; to balance, counterpose. [from 16th c.]
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, Romeo & Juliet, I.2:
      you saw her faire none els being by, / Her selfe poysd with her selfe in either eye.
  6. To hold (something) in equilibrium, to hold balanced and ready; to carry (something) ready to be used. [from 16th c.]
    I poised the crowbar in my hand, and waited.
    to poise the scales of a balance
  7. To keep (something) in equilibrium; to hold suspended or balanced. [from 17th c.]
    The rock was poised precariously on the edge of the cliff.
  8. To ascertain, as if by balancing; to weigh.
    • He cannot sincerely consider the strength, poise the weight, and discern the evidence.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • poise on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • speoi

Old French

Alternative forms

  • peise (Anglo-Norman)

Noun

poise f (oblique plural poises, nominative singular poise, nominative plural poises)

  1. weight
  2. a unit of measure of unknown value (which presumably varied because of the technology of the time)

Descendants

  • English: poise

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (poise)

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