Principle vs Paradigm what difference

what is difference between Principle and Paradigm

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French principe, from Latin prīncipium (beginning, foundation), from prīnceps (first); see prince.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹɪnsɪpəl/, /ˈpɹɪnsəpəl/
  • Hyphenation: prin‧ci‧ple
  • Homophone: principal

Noun

principle (plural principles)

  1. A fundamental assumption or guiding belief.
    • Let us consider ‘my dog is asleep on the floor’ again. Frege thinks that this sentence can be analyzed in various different ways. Instead of treating it as expressing the application of __ is asleep on the floor to my dog, we can think of it as expressing the application of the concept
           my dog is asleep on __
      to the object
           the floor
      (see Frege 1919). Frege recognizes what is now a commonplace in the logical analysis of natural language. We can attribute more than one logical form to a single sentence. Let us call this the principle of multiple analyses. Frege does not claim that the principle always holds, but as we shall see, modern type theory does claim this.
  2. A rule used to choose among solutions to a problem.
  3. (sometimes pluralized) Moral rule or aspect.
    I don’t doubt your principles.
    You are clearly a person of principle.
    It’s the principle of the thing; I won’t do business with someone I can’t trust.
  4. (physics) A rule or law of nature, or the basic idea on how the laws of nature are applied.
    Bernoulli’s Principle
    The Pauli Exclusion Principle prevents two fermions from occupying the same state.
    The principle of the internal combustion engine
  5. A fundamental essence, particularly one producing a given quality.
    • 1845, William Gregory, Outlines of Chemistry
      Cathartine is the bitter, purgative principle of senna.
  6. (obsolete) A beginning.
  7. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of Being Religious
      The soul of man is an active principle.
  8. An original faculty or endowment.
    • 1828, Dugal Stewart, The Philosophy of the Active and Moral Powers of Man
      those active principles whose direct and ultimate object is the communication either of enjoyment or suffering

Usage notes

  • Principle (“moral rule”), as a noun, is often confused with principal, which can be an adjective (“most important”) or a noun (“school principal”). A memory aid to avoid this confusion is: “The principal alphabetic principle places A before E“.

Synonyms

  • (moral rule or aspect): tenet

Derived terms

Related terms

  • prince
  • principal
  • principality

Translations

Verb

principle (third-person singular simple present principles, present participle principling, simple past and past participle principled)

  1. (transitive) To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet or rule of conduct.
    • Let an enthusiast be principled that he or his teacher is inspired.

Further reading

  • principle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • principle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Alternative forms

  • paradigma

Etymology

Established 1475-85 from Late Latin paradīgma, from Ancient Greek παράδειγμα (parádeigma, pattern), from παραδείκνυμι (paradeíknumi, I show [beside] or compare) + -μα (-ma, forming nouns concerning the results of actions).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpæ.ɹə.daɪm/
  • (US) enPR: ˈpär.ə.dīm, IPA(key): /ˈpæɹ.ə.daɪm/, /ˈpɛɹ.ə.daɪm/, /ˈpeɪɹ.ə.daɪm/
    (Marymarrymerry merger)

Noun

paradigm (plural paradigms or paradigmata)

  1. A pattern, a way of doing something, especially (now often derogatory) a pattern of thought, a system of beliefs, a conceptual framework.
    Synonyms: model, worldview
  2. An example serving as the model for such a pattern.
    Synonyms: template, exemplar, posterboy
    • 2000, “Estate of William F. Jenkins v. Paramount Pictures Corp.”:
    • 2003, Nicholas Asher and Alex Lascarides, Logics of Conversation, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 46:
  3. (linguistics) A set of all forms which contain a common element, especially the set of all inflectional forms of a word or a particular grammatical category.

Synonyms

  • (exemplar): Thesaurus:exemplar, Thesaurus:model

Hyponyms

  • programming paradigm

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • “paradigm”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN
  • “paradigm” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “paradigm” in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

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