Process vs Progress what difference

what is difference between Process and Progress

English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French procés (journey), from Latin prōcessus, from prōcēdō.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɹəʊsɛs/
  • (General American) enPR: prŏʹsĕs, IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑsɛs/
  • (Canada, rarely US) enPR: prōʹsĕs, IPA(key): /ˈpɹoʊsɛs/
  • Hyphenation: pro‧cess

Noun

process (plural processes)

  1. A series of events which produce a result (the product).
  2. (manufacturing) A set of procedures used to produce a product, most commonly in the food and chemical industries.
    • 1960, Mack Tyner, Process Engineering Calculations: Material and Energy Balances – Ordinarily a process plant will use a steam boiler to supply its process heat requirements and to drive a steam-turbine generator.
    • 1987, J. R. Richards, Principles of control system design in Modelling and control of fermentation processes – The words plant or process infer generally any dynamic system, be it primarily mechanical, electrical, or chemical process in nature, and may extend also to include social or economic systems.
  3. A path of succession of states through which a system passes.
  4. (anatomy) Successive physiological responses to keep or restore health.
  5. (law) Documents issued by a court in the course of a lawsuit or action at law, such as a summons, mandate, or writ.
    • 1711, John Spotiswood, The Form of Process, 39:
      But if either at Calling by the Clerk, after the Session Bell, or before the Ordinary by the Roll, an Advocat compears, and craves to be Marked for the Defender, and to see the Process; The Clerk in the first Case, and the Judge in the second, will allow him to see it
  6. (biology) An outgrowth of tissue or cell.
  7. (anatomy) A structure that arises above a surface.
  8. (computing) An executable task or program.
  9. The centre mark that players aim at in the game of squails.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • due-process
  • interprocess
Related terms
Related terms
  • proceed
  • procedure
Descendants
  • Japanese: プロセス (purosesu)
Translations

Verb

process (third-person singular simple present processes, present participle processing, simple past and past participle processed)

  1. (transitive) To perform a particular process on a thing.
  2. (transitive) To retrieve, store, classify, manipulate, transmit etc. (data, signals, etc.), especially using computer techniques.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To think about a piece of information, or a concept, in order to assimilate it, and perhaps accept it in a modified state.
  4. (transitive, photography, film) To develop photographic film.
  5. (transitive, law) To take legal proceedings against.
    • 1845, Report from Her Majesty’s Commissioners of inquiry into the state of the law and practice in respect to the occupation of land in Ireland
      When I saw that he would not let me alone, I processed him for £12. My mother was with his brother John, and he allowed her six guineas for clothes; and if she did not want the money, he would allow it to me in the rent, and I made him pay that when he would not leave me alone.
Derived terms
  • processed
  • processor
Translations

Etymology 2

Back-formation from procession.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American, Canada) enPR: prə-sĕsʹ, IPA(key): /pɹəˈsɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs
  • Hyphenation: pro‧cess

Verb

process (third-person singular simple present processes, present participle processing, simple past and past participle processed)

  1. To walk in a procession

Translations

Anagrams

  • Cospers, Crespos, corpses, scopers

Latvian

Etymology

From Latin prōcessus (progression, progress, process), perfect passive participle of prōcēdō (I advance, proceed), from prō- +‎ cēdō (I go, move, proceed).

Noun

process m (1st declension)

  1. process

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From Latin processus (progression, progress, process), perfect passive participle of prōcēdō (I advance, proceed), from prō- +‎ cēdō (I go, move, proceed).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /prʊˈsɛs/

Noun

process c

  1. process

Declension

Derived terms

  • processa

Related terms

  • processuell

References

  • process in Svensk ordbok (SO)


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English progresse, from Old French progres (a going forward), from Latin prōgressus (an advance), from the participle stem of prōgredī (to go forward, advance, develop), from pro- (forth, before) +‎ gradi (to walk, go). Displaced native Old English forþgang.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: prō’grĕs, IPA(key): /ˈpɹəʊɡɹɛs/, /ˈpɹɒɡɹɛs/
  • (US) enPR: prä’grĕs, prō’grĕs, IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑɡɹɛs/, /ˈpɹoʊɡɹɛs/, /-ɹəs/
  • Rhymes: -əʊɡɹɛs, -ɒɡɹɛs

Noun

progress (countable and uncountable, plural progresses)

  1. Movement or advancement through a series of events, or points in time; development through time. [from 15th c.]
    Testing for the new antidote is currently in progress.
  2. Specifically, advancement to a higher or more developed state; development, growth. [from 15th c.]
    Science has made extraordinary progress in the last fifty years.
  3. An official journey made by a monarch or other high personage; a state journey, a circuit. [from 15th c.]
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 7:
      … Queen Elizabeth in one of her progresses, stopping at Crawley to breakfast, was so delighted with some remarkably fine Hampshire beer which was then presented to her by the Crawley of the day (a handsome gentleman with a trim beard and a good leg), that she forthwith erected Crawley into a borough to send two members to Parliament …
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 124:
      With the king about to go on progress, the trials and executions were deliberately timed.
  4. (now rare) A journey forward; travel. [from 15th c.]
    • 1887, Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders:
      Now Tim began to be struck with these loitering progresses along the garden boundaries in the gloaming, and wondered what they boded.
  5. Movement onwards or forwards or towards a specific objective or direction; advance. [from 16th c.]
    The thick branches overhanging the path made progress difficult.
Usage notes
  • To make progress is often used instead of the verb progress. This allows complex modification of progress in ways that can not be well approximated by adverbs modifying the verb. See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take
Derived terms
  • work-in-progress
Translations

Etymology 2

From the noun. Lapsed into disuse in the 17th century, except in the US. Considered an Americanism on reintroduction to use in the UK.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prəgrĕs’, IPA(key): /pɹəˈɡɹɛs/

Verb

progress (third-person singular simple present progresses, present participle progressing, simple past and past participle progressed)

  1. (intransitive) to move, go, or proceed forward; to advance.
    They progress through the museum.
  2. (intransitive) to improve; to become better or more complete.
    Societies progress unevenly.
  3. (transitive) To move (something) forward; to advance, to expedite.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 266:
      Or […] they came to progress matters in which Dudley had taken a hand, and left defrauded or bound over to the king.
Antonyms
  • regress
  • retrogress
Translations

Related terms

Further reading

  • progress in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • progress in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Latvian

Etymology

Via other European languages, ultimately borrowed from Latin prōgressus (an advance), from the participle stem of prōgredī (to go forward, advance, develop), from pro- (forth, before) + gradi (to walk, go).

Pronunciation

Noun

progress m (1st declension)

  1. progress (development, esp. to a higher, fuller, more advanced state; transition from a lower to a higher level)
    Synonyms: attīstība, evolūcija

Declension

Related terms


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial