Proscription vs Prescription what difference

what is difference between Proscription and Prescription

English

Etymology

From Middle English proscripcion, from Latin prōscrīptiō, from prōscrībō (originally “publish in writing”), from prō- and scrībō (write).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈskɹɪp.ʃən/, /pɹoʊˈskɹɪp.ʃən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪpʃən
  • Hyphenation: pro‧scrip‧tion

Noun

proscription (countable and uncountable, plural proscriptions)

  1. A prohibition.
  2. (historical) Decree of condemnation toward one or more persons, especially in the Roman antiquity.
    • 1837, Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, Tacitus’ Annals, book 1
      He was wholly unopposed, for the boldest spirits had fallen in battle, or in the proscription […]
  3. The act of proscribing, or its result.
  4. A decree or law that prohibits.

Usage notes

  • Not to be confused with prescription

Related terms

  • proscribe
  • proscriptive
  • proscriptively

Translations


French

Etymology

From Latin prōscrīptiō, from prōscrībere (originally “publish in writing”), from prō- and scrībere.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʁɔs.kʁip.sjɔ̃/

Noun

proscription f (plural proscriptions)

  1. (historical) Condemnation made against political opponents, especially the Roman antiquity and during the French Revolution.
  2. Banishment of a person or group.
  3. Proscription (2)

Related terms

  • proscrire
  • proscripteur

Further reading

  • “proscription” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • præscription (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French, from Old French prescripcion, from Latin praescriptio.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈskɹɪpʃən/, (proscribed) /pɝˈskɹɪpʃən/

Noun

prescription (countable and uncountable, plural prescriptions)

  1. (law)
    1. The act of prescribing a rule, law, etc..
      • “Jurisdiction to prescribe” is a state’s authority to make its laws applicable to certain persons or activities. — Richard G. Alexander, Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996: Congress exceeds its jurisdiction to prescribe law. Washington and Lee Law Review, 1997.
    2. Also called extinctive prescription or liberative prescription. A time period within which a right must be exercised, otherwise it will be extinguished.
    3. Also called acquisitive prescription. A time period after which a person who has, in the role of an owner, uninterruptedly, peacefully, and publicly possessed another’s property acquires the property. The described process is known as acquisition by prescription and adverse possession.
  2. (medicine, pharmacy, pharmacology) A written order, as by a physician or nurse practitioner, for the administration of a medicine or other intervention. See also scrip.
    • The surgeon wrote a prescription for a pain killer and physical therapy.
  3. (medicine) The prescription medicine or intervention so prescribed.
    • The pharmacist gave her a bottle containing her prescription.
  4. (ophthalmology) The formal description of the lens geometry needed for spectacles, etc..
    • The optician followed the optometrist’s prescription for her new eyeglasses.
  5. (linguistics) The act or practice of laying down norms of language usage, as opposed to description, i.e. recording and describing actual usage.
  6. (linguistics) An instance of a prescriptive pronouncement.
  7. A plan or procedure to obtain a given end result; a recipe.
    • “Early to bed and early to rise” is a prescription for a healthy lifestyle.
  8. (obsolete) Circumscription; restraint; limitation.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 2:
      There is an air of prescription about him which is always agreeable to Sir Leicester; he receives it as a kind of tribute. … It expresses, as it were, the steward of the legal mysteries, the butler of the legal cellar, of the Dedlocks.

Usage notes

  • Do not confuse with proscription.

Synonyms

  • forescript
  • (medicine): , Rx
  • (a plan or procedure): recipe

Related terms

  • prescribe

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

prescription (not comparable)

  1. (of a drug, etc.) only available with a physician or nurse practitioner’s written prescription
    Many powerful pain killers are prescription drugs in the U.S.

Translations

See also

  • prescriptivism

French

Etymology

From Old French prescripcion, borrowed from Latin praescriptio, praescriptionem.

Pronunciation

Noun

prescription f (plural prescriptions)

  1. prescription (all senses)

Norman

Etymology

From Old French prescripcion, borrowed from Latin praescriptio, praescriptionem.

Noun

prescription f (plural prescriptions)

  1. (Jersey) prescription

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial