Refuse vs Deny what difference

what is difference between Refuse and Deny

English

Etymology 1

Borrowed into late Middle English from Middle French refusé, past participle of refuser (to refuse).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rĕfʹyo͞os, IPA(key): /ˈɹɛfjuːs/

Adjective

refuse (comparative more refuse, superlative most refuse)

  1. Discarded, rejected.

Noun

refuse (uncountable)

  1. Collectively, items or material that have been discarded; rubbish, garbage.
Synonyms
  • discards
  • garbage (US)
  • rubbish (UK)
  • trash (US)
  • See also Thesaurus:trash
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French refuser, from Vulgar Latin *refusare, a blend of Classical Latin refutō and recusō.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rĭfyo͞ozʹ, IPA(key): /ɹɪˈfjuːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

refuse (third-person singular simple present refuses, present participle refusing, simple past and past participle refused)

  1. (transitive) To decline (a request or demand).
  2. (intransitive) To decline a request or demand, forbear; to withhold permission.
  3. (military) To throw back, or cause to keep back (as the centre, a wing, or a flank), out of the regular alignment when troops are about to engage the enemy.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To disown.
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Synonyms
  • (decline): decline, reject, nill, say no to, turn down, veto, withsake, withsay
  • (decline a request or demand): say no, forbear
Translations

Noun

refuse

  1. (obsolete) refusal
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairfax to this entry?)

Etymology 3

re- +‎ fuse

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rēfyo͞ozʹ, IPA(key): /ɹiːˈfjuːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

refuse (third-person singular simple present refuses, present participle refusing, simple past and past participle refused)

  1. To melt again.
Related terms
  • refusion

French

Verb

refuse

  1. inflection of refuser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

  • férues

Latin

Participle

refūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of refūsus

References

  • refuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press


English

Etymology

From Middle English denyen, from Old French denoier (to deny, to repudiate) (French dénier), from Latin denegare (to deny, to refuse), from de- (away) and negare (to refuse), the latter ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ne (no, not). Doublet of denegate.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈnaɪ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dəˈnaɪ/, /dɪ-/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: de‧ny

Verb

deny (third-person singular simple present denies, present participle denying, simple past and past participle denied)

  1. (transitive) To disallow or reject.
  2. (transitive) To assert that something is not true.
  3. (ditransitive) To refuse to give or grant something to someone.
    • 1754, Jonathan Edwards, An Inquiry into the Modern Prevailing Notions Respecting that Freedom of the Will which is supposed to be Essential to Moral Agency
      To some men, it is more agreeable to deny a vicious inclination, than to gratify it.
  4. To take something away from someone; to deprive of.
  5. (sports, transitive) To prevent from scoring.
  6. To disclaim connection with, responsibility for, etc.; to refuse to acknowledge; to disown; to abjure; to disavow.
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      the falsehood of denying his opinion
    • 1827, John Keble, The Christian Year
      thou thrice denied, yet thrice beloved
  7. (obsolete) To refuse (to do or accept something).

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Deny can have a connotation that the denial is false; he denied knowing the accused has a more suspicious tone than he said he did not know the accused. However, in some formal usages, e.g. medical records, it can have a more neutral sense (patient denies chest pain).
  • See refute.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (assert something is not true): gainsay, contradict, withsay, refute, disclaim

Antonyms

  • (disallow): allow
  • (assert something is true): confirm, affirm

Derived terms

  • deniability
  • denier
  • justice delayed is justice denied

Related terms

  • denial

Translations

Anagrams

  • E.D.N.Y., Ynde, dyne

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