Reverse vs Inverse what difference

what is difference between Reverse and Inverse

English

Etymology

From Middle English revers (noun, adjective}, reversen (verb), from Anglo-Norman revers (noun, adjective), reverser (verb), Middle French revers (noun, adjective), reverser (verb), and their source, Latin reversus (perfect passive participle), reversō (verb), from re- + versō. Doublet of revers.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈvɜːs/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s

Adjective

reverse (not comparable)

  1. Opposite, contrary; going in the opposite direction. [from 14th c.]
  2. Pertaining to engines, vehicle movement etc. moving in a direction opposite to the usual direction. [from 19th c.]
  3. (rail transport, of points) To be in the non-default position; to be set for the lesser-used route.
  4. Turned upside down; greatly disturbed.
    • He found the sea diverse / With many a windy storm reverse.
  5. (botany) Reversed.
  6. (genetics) In which cDNA synthetization is obtained from an RNA template.

Antonyms

  • (rail transport): normal

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

reverse (not comparable)

  1. (now rare) In a reverse way or direction; in reverse; upside-down. [from 16thc. (from the 14thc. in Middle English)]
    • 1963, Donal Serrell Thomas, Points of Contact:
      The man was killed to feed his image fat / Within this pictured world that ran reverse, / Where miracles alone were ever plain.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:vice versa or Thesaurus:upside down

Noun

reverse (plural reverses)

  1. The opposite of something. [from 14th c.]
  2. The act of going backwards; a reversal. [from 15th c.]
    • 1808, Charles Lamb, Specimens of the English Dramatic Poets Who Lived About the Time of Shakespeare
      By a reverse of fortune, Stephen becomes rich.
  3. A piece of misfortune; a setback. [from 16th c.]
    • 1990, Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game, Folio Society 2010, p. 309:
      In fact, though the Russians did not yet know it, the British had met with a reverse.
  4. The tails side of a coin, or the side of a medal or badge that is opposite the obverse. [from 17th c.]
  5. The side of something facing away from a viewer, or from what is considered the front; the other side. [from 18th c.]
  6. The gear setting of an automobile that makes it travel backwards. [from 19th c.]
    Synonym: reverse gear
  7. A thrust in fencing made with a backward turn of the hand; a backhanded stroke.
  8. (surgery) A turn or fold made in bandaging, by which the direction of the bandage is changed.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

reverse (third-person singular simple present reverses, present participle reversing, simple past and past participle reversed)

  1. (transitive) To turn something around so that it faces the opposite direction or runs in the opposite sequence.
    to reverse the order of books on a shelf
    to reverse a portion of video footage
  2. (transitive) To turn something inside out or upside down.
    • 1672, William Temple, Essay on the Original and Nature of Government
      A pyramid reversed may stand upon his point if balanced by admirable skill.
  3. (transitive) To transpose the positions of two things.
  4. (transitive) To change totally; to alter to the opposite.
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To return, come back.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      Bene they all dead, and laide in dolefull herse? / Or doen they onely sleepe, and shall againe reuerse?
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To turn away; to cause to depart.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to return; to recall.
  8. (law) To revoke a law, or to change a decision into its opposite.
    to reverse a judgment, sentence, or decree
  9. (ergative) To cause a mechanism or a vehicle to operate or move in the opposite direction to normal.
  10. (chemistry) To change the direction of a reaction such that the products become the reactants and vice-versa.
  11. (rail transport, transitive) To place a set of points in the reverse position
  12. (rail transport, intransitive, of points) to move from the normal position to the reverse position
  13. To overthrow; to subvert.
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, Conformity to the World destructive of our Happiness
      Custom [] reverses even the distinctions of good and evil.
  14. (computing) Short for reverse-engineer.
    • 2011, Eldad Eilam, Reversing: Secrets of Reverse Engineering
      Reversing is also heavily used in connection with malicious software, on both ends of the fence: []
    • 2012, Christopher C. Elisan, Malware, Rootkits & Botnets: A Beginner’s Guide (page 117)
      [] but in some instances where malware is proving to be difficult, reversing is needed.

Antonyms

  • (to turn something in the opposite direction): unreverse
  • (rail transport): normalise / normalize (transitive and intransitive)

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Reserve, Reveres, reserve, reveres, severer, veerers

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.vɛʁs/

Verb

reverse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of reverser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of reverser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of reverser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of reverser
  5. second-person singular imperative of reverser

Anagrams

  • réserve, réservé

Latin

Participle

reverse

  1. vocative masculine singular of reversus

References

  • reverse in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [reˈverse]

Verb

reverse

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of revărsa
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of revărsa

Spanish

Verb

reverse

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of reversar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of reversar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of reversar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of reversar.


English

Etymology

Recorded since 1440, from Latin inversus, the past participle of invertere (to invert), itself from in- (in, on) + vertere (to turn).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnˈvɝs/, /ˈɪnvɝs/

Adjective

inverse (not comparable)

  1. Opposite in effect, nature or order.
  2. Reverse, opposite in order.
  3. (botany) Inverted; having a position or mode of attachment the reverse of that which is usual.
  4. (mathematics) Having the properties of an inverse; said with reference to any two operations, which, when both are performed in succession upon any quantity, reproduce that quantity.
  5. (geometry) That has the property of being an inverse (the result of a circle inversion of a given point or geometrical figure); that is constructed by circle inversion.
  6. (category theory, of a category) Whose every element has an inverse (morphism which is both a left inverse and a right inverse).

Derived terms

  • inverse function
  • inverse image
  • inverse spelling
  • inversely
  • inverse video

Related terms

  • inversion
  • inversive
  • reverse

Translations

Noun

inverse (plural inverses)

  1. An inverted state: a state in which something has been turned (properly) upside down or (loosely) inside out or backwards.
    Cowgirl is the inverse of missionary.
    321 is the inverse of 123.
  2. The result of an inversion, particularly:
    1. The reverse of any procedure or process.
      Uninstalling is the inverse of installation.
    2. (mathematics) A ratio etc. in which the antecedents and consequents are switched.
      The inverse of a:b is b:a.
    3. (geometry) The result of a circle inversion; the set of all such points; the curve described by such a set.
      The inverse P‘ of a point P is the point on a ray from the center O through P such that OP × OP‘ = or the set of all such points.
    4. (logic) The non-truth-preserving proposition constructed by negating both the premise and conclusion of an initially given proposition.
      “Anything that isn’t a dog doesn’t go to heaven” is the inverse of “All dogs go to heaven.” More generally,




      ¬


      p



      ¬


      q




      {\displaystyle \lnot {\mathsf {p}}\to \lnot {\mathsf {q}}}

      is the inverse of






      p





      q




      {\displaystyle {\mathsf {p}}\to {\mathsf {q}}}

      and is equivalent to the converse proposition






      q





      p




      {\displaystyle {\mathsf {q}}\to {\mathsf {p}}}

      .

      • 1896, James Welton, A Manual of Logic, 2nd ed., Bk iii, Ch. iii, §102:
        Inversion is the inferring, from a given proposition, another proposition whose subject is the contradictory of the subject of the original proposition. The given proposition is called the Invertend, that which is inferred from it is termed the Inverse… The rule for Inversion is: Convert either the Obverted Converse or the Obverted Contrapositive.
  3. (mathematics) A second element which negates a first; in a binary operation, the element for which the binary operation—when applied to both it and an initially given element—yields the operation’s identity element, specifically:
    1. (addition) The negative of a given number.
      The additive inverse of




      x


      {\displaystyle x}

      is





      x


      {\displaystyle -x}

      , as




      x

      x
      =
      0


      {\displaystyle x-x=0}

      , as




      0


      {\displaystyle 0}

      is the additive identity element.

    2. (multiplication) One divided by a given number.
      The multiplicative inverse of




      x


      {\displaystyle x}

      is





      x


      1




      {\displaystyle x^{-1}}

      , as




      x
      ×

      x


      1


      =
      1


      {\displaystyle x\times x^{-1}=1}

      , as




      1


      {\displaystyle 1}

      the multiplicative identity element.

    3. (functions) A second function which, when combined with the initially given function, yields as its output any term inputted into the first function.
      The compositional inverse of a function




      f


      {\displaystyle f}

      is





      f


      1




      {\displaystyle f^{-1}}

      , as




      f
       

      f


      1


      =


      I




      {\displaystyle f\ f^{-1}={\mathit {I}}}

      , as






      I




      {\displaystyle {\mathit {I}}}

      is the identity function. That is,





      x
      ,
      f
      (

      f


      1


      (
      x
      )
      )
      =


      I


      (
      x
      )
      =
      x


      {\displaystyle \forall x,f(f^{-1}(x))={\mathit {I}}(x)=x}

      .

  4. (category theory) A morphism which is both a left inverse and a right inverse.
  5. (card games) The winning of the coup in a game of rouge et noir by a card of a color different from that first dealt; the area of the table reserved for bets upon such an outcome.
    • 1850, Henry George Bohn, The Hand-book of Games, p. 343:
      If the player… be determined to try his luck on the inverse, he must place his money on a yellow circle, or rather a collection of circles, situated at the extremity of the table.
    • 1950, Lawrence Hawkins Dawson, Hoyle’s Games Modernized, 20th ed., p. 291:
      The tailleur never mentions the words ‘Black’ or ‘Inverse’, but always says that Red wins or Red loses, and that the colour wins or the colour loses.
  6. (linguistics, Kiowa-Tanoan) A grammatical number marking that indicates the opposite grammatical number (or numbers) of the default number specification of noun class.

Synonyms

  • (addition): additive inverse
  • (multiplication): multiplicative inverse
  • (composition): compositional inverse
  • (geometry): inverse point, inverse curve

Translations

See also

  • (logic): obverse, converse, contraposition

Verb

inverse (third-person singular simple present inverses, present participle inversing, simple past and past participle inversed)

  1. (surveying) To compute the bearing and distance between two points.

Antonyms

  • compute (a point).

Anagrams

  • Severin, enviers, inserve, veiners, venires, versine

Danish

Adjective

inverse

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of invers

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: in‧ver‧se

Noun

inverse m or f (plural inversen)

  1. inverse

Adjective

inverse

  1. Inflected form of invers

Anagrams

  • viseren

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.vɛʁs/

Etymology 1

From Latin inversus.

Adjective

inverse (plural inverses)

  1. inverse, the other way round
Derived terms
  • barre inverse
  • inversement

Noun

inverse m (plural inverses)

  1. the inverse, the contrary
    Synonyms: contraire, envers
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

inverse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of inverser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of inverser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of inverser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of inverser
  5. second-person singular imperative of inverser

Further reading

  • “inverse” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • enivres, enivrés
  • reviens
  • Séverin
  • vernies

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

inverse

  1. inflection of invers:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

Adjective

inverse

  1. feminine plural of inverso

Anagrams

  • svenire

Latin

Participle

inverse

  1. vocative masculine singular of inversus

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