Revolve vs Rotate what difference

what is difference between Revolve and Rotate

English

Etymology

From Middle English revolven (to change direction), borrowed from Old French revolver (to reflect upon), from Latin revolvere, present active infinitive of revolvō (turn over, roll back, reflect upon), from re- (back) + volvō (roll); see voluble, volve.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈvɒlv/

Verb

revolve (third-person singular simple present revolves, present participle revolving, simple past and past participle revolved)

  1. (Physical movement.)
    1. (transitive, now rare) To bring back into a particular place or condition; to restore. [from 15th c.]
    2. (transitive) To cause (something) to turn around a central point. [from 16th c.]
    3. (intransitive) To orbit a central point (especially of a celestial body). [from 17th c.]
    4. (intransitive) To rotate around an axis. [from 17th c.]
    5. (intransitive) To move in order or sequence. [from 17th c.]
  2. (Mental activity.)
    1. (transitive, now rare) To ponder on; to reflect repeatedly upon; to consider all aspects of. [from 15th c.]
      • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 82:
        These are the difficulties which arise to me on revolving this scheme […].
      • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, Bk.2, Ch.6, Monk Samson:
        He sits silent, revolving many thoughts, at the foot of St. Edmund’s Shrine.
    2. (transitive, obsolete) To read through, to study (a book, author etc.). [15th–19th c.]
      • 1671, John Milton, Paradise Regain’d:
        This having heard, strait I again revolv’d / The Law and Prophets.

Related terms

  • revolution
  • revolver
  • the world doesn’t revolve around you

Translations

Further reading

  • revolve in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • revolve in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Noun

revolve (plural revolves)

  1. (theater) The rotation of part of the scenery within a theatrical production.
  2. (theater) The rotating section itself.
    • 2003, Gary Philip Cohen, The Community Theater Handbook (page 134)
      [] a revolving stage, two-level platforms stage left and stage right, and a large bridge that connected the platforms midstage, twelve feet up off the revolve.
  3. (obsolete) A radical change; revolution.

Anagrams

  • evolver

Latin

Verb

revolve

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of revolvō

Portuguese

Verb

revolve

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of revolver
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of revolver


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin rotātus, perfect passive participle of rotō (revolve), from rota (wheel).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: rōtāt’, IPA(key): /ɹəʊˈteɪt/
  • (US) enPR: rō’tāt, IPA(key): /ˈɹoʊteɪt/

Verb

rotate (third-person singular simple present rotates, present participle rotating, simple past and past participle rotated)

  1. (intransitive) To spin, turn, or revolve.
    He rotated in his chair to face me.
  2. (intransitive) To advance through a sequence; to take turns.
    The nurses’ shifts rotate each week.
  3. (intransitive, of aircraft) To lift the nose during takeoff, just prior to liftoff.
    The aircraft rotates at sixty knots.
  4. (transitive) To spin, turn, or revolve something.
    Rotate the dial to the left.
  5. (transitive) To advance something through a sequence; to allocate or deploy in turns.
    • 1975, Architectural Digest (volume 32, page 112)
      I’ve always admired the Japanese point of view that holds it best not to have a great number of objects around at one time but to rotate possessions — and display them with great simplicity.
  6. (transitive) To replace older materials or to place older materials in front of newer ones so that older ones get used first.
    The supermarket rotates the stock daily so that old foods don’t sit around.
  7. (transitive) To grow or plant (crops) in a certain order.

Synonyms

  • (to turn) revolve
  • (to make turn) circumvolve

Derived terms

  • rotation
  • rotatable

Related terms

  • rota

Translations

Adjective

rotate (not comparable)

  1. Having the parts spreading out like a wheel; wheel-shaped.
    a rotate spicule or scale; a rotate corolla

Anagrams

  • terato-, totear

Italian

Verb

rotate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of rotare
  2. second-person plural imperative of rotare
  3. feminine plural of rotato

Anagrams

  • attero, attore, ettaro, oretta, teatro

Latin

Verb

rotāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of rotō

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