Room vs Board what difference

what is difference between Room and Board

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹuːm/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹum/
  • (UK, New England, Tidewater) IPA(key): /ɹʊm/
  • Rhymes: -uːm, -ʊm
  • Homophone: rheum

Etymology 1

From Middle English roum, from Old English rūm (room, space), from Proto-Germanic *rūmą (room), from Proto-Indo-European *rowə- (free space). Cognate with Low German Ruum, Dutch ruimte (space) and Dutch ruim (cargo load), German Raum (space, interior space), Danish rum (space, locality), Norwegian rom (space), Swedish rum (space, location), and also with Latin rūs (country, field, farm) through Indo-European. More at rural.

It is ostensibly an exception to the Great Vowel Shift, which otherwise would have produced the pronunciation /ɹaʊm/, but /aʊ/ does not occur before noncoronal consonants in Modern English.

Noun

room (countable and uncountable, plural rooms)

  1. (now rare) Opportunity or scope (to do something). [from 9th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts I:
      Thou lorde whiche knowest the hertes of all men, shewe whether thou hast chosen of these two, that the one maye take the roume of this ministracion, and apostleshippe from the which Judas by transgression fell, that he myght goo to his awne place.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa:
      Nor shalt thou give me room to doubt whether it be necessity or love, that inspires this condescending impulse.
  2. (uncountable) Space for something, or to carry out an activity. [from 10th c.]
    • 2010, Jonathan Franklin, The Guardian, 27 Aug 2010:
      He explains they have enough room to stand and lie down, points out the “little cup to brush our teeth”, and the place where they pray.
  3. (archaic) A particular portion of space. [from 11th c.]
    • 1614, Thomas Overbury, Characters
      If he have but twelve pence in his purse, he will give it for the best room in a playhouse.
    • When thou art bidden of any man to a wedding, sit not down in the highest room.
  4. (uncountable, figuratively) Sufficient space for or to do something. [from 15th c.]
    • 2010, Roger Bootle, The Telegraph, 12 Sep 2010:
      There are major disagreements within the Coalition and politicians always want to retain room for manoeuvre.
  5. (nautical) A space between the timbers of a ship’s frame. [from 15th c.]
  6. (obsolete) Place; stead.
  7. (countable) A separate part of a building, enclosed by walls, a floor and a ceiling. [from 15th c.]
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice:
      Miss Bingley made no answer, and soon afterwards she got up and walked about the room.
  8. (countable, with possessive pronoun) (One’s) bedroom.
  9. (in the plural) A set of rooms inhabited by someone; one’s lodgings. [from 17th c.]
  10. (usually in the singular, metonymically) The people in a room. [from 17th c.]
    He was good at reading rooms.
    It was fun to watch her work the room.
  11. (mining) An area for working in a coal mine. [from 17th c.]
  12. (caving) A portion of a cave that is wider than a passage. [from 17th c.]
  13. (Internet, countable) An IRC or chat room. [from 20th c.]
  14. Place or position in society; office; rank; post, sometimes when vacated by its former occupant.
    • When he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judea in the room of his father Herod.
    • 1848, Henry Walter (editor), William Tyndale (original author), Doctrinal Treatises and Introductions to Different Portions of the Holy Scriptures
      Neither that I look for a higher room in heaven.
  15. A quantity of furniture sufficient to furnish one room.
    • 1985, August Wilson, Fences
      “I understand you need some furniture and can’t get no credit.” I liked to fell over. He say, “I’ll give you all the credit you want, but you got to pay the interest on it.” I told him, “Give me three rooms worth and charge whatever you want.”
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:room.
Synonyms
  • (space): elbow room, legroom, space
  • (part of a building): chamber, quarters
  • (part of a cave): chamber
  • rm
  • See also Thesaurus:room
Hyponyms
Meronyms
  • walls
  • windows
  • doors
  • furniture
  • wall sockets
  • switches
  • light fixtures
  • appliances
Holonyms
  • house
  • building
  • structure
  • apartment
  • home
  • flat
  • hotel
  • hospital
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ルーム (rūmu)
  • Kikuyu: rumu
Translations

Verb

room (third-person singular simple present rooms, present participle rooming, simple past and past participle roomed)

  1. (intransitive) To reside, especially as a boarder or tenant.
    Doctor Watson roomed with Sherlock Holmes at Baker Street.
  2. (transitive) To assign to a room; to allocate a room to.
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English roum, rom, rum, from Old English rūm (roomy, spacious, ample, extensive, large, open, unencumbered, unoccupied, temporal, long, extended, great, liberal, unrestricted, unfettered, clear, loose, free from conditions, free from occupation, not restrained within due limits, lax, far-reaching, abundant, noble, august), from Proto-Germanic *rūmaz (roomy, spacious), from Proto-Indo-European *rewh₁- (free space). Cognate with Scots roum (spacious, roomy), Dutch ruim (roomy, spacious, wide), Danish rum (wide, spacious), German raum (wide), Icelandic rúmur (spacious).

Adjective

room (comparative more room, superlative most room)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Wide; spacious; roomy.

Etymology 3

From Middle English rome, from Old English rūme (widely, spaciously, roomily, far and wide, so as to extend over a wide space, liberally, extensively, amply, abundantly, in a high degree, without restriction or encumbrance, without the pressure of care, light-heartedly, without obstruction, plainly, clearly, in detail). Cognate with Dutch ruim (amply, adverb).

Adverb

room (comparative more room, superlative most room)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Far; at a distance; wide in space or extent.
  2. (nautical) Off from the wind.

Etymology 4

Noun

room (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of roum (deep blue dye)

Further reading

  • room on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • room at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • room in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Moor, Moro, Romo, moor

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch room, from Middle Dutch rôme, from Old Dutch *rōm, from Proto-Germanic *raumaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rʊə̯m/

Noun

room (uncountable)

  1. cream

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch rôme, from Old Dutch *rōm, from Proto-Germanic *raumaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /roːm/
  • Hyphenation: room
  • Rhymes: -oːm

Noun

room m (uncountable)

  1. cream (of milk)

Derived terms

  • afromen
  • ontromen
  • roomboter
  • roomijs
  • roomsaus
  • slagroom

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: room

Anagrams

  • moor


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bôd, IPA(key): /bɔːd/
  • (General American) enPR: bôrd, IPA(key): /bɔɹd/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: bōrd, IPA(key): /bo(ː)ɹd/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: bōəd, IPA(key): /boəd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d
  • Homophone: bored; baud, bawd (nonrhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English bord, from Old English bord (board; plank; table; shield; deck; ship; boundary), from Proto-West Germanic *bord, from Proto-Germanic *burdą (board; plank; table), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerdʰ- (to cut).

Noun

board (countable and uncountable, plural boards)

  1. A relatively long, wide and thin piece of any material, usually wood or similar, often for use in construction or furniture-making.
  2. A device (e.g., switchboard) containing electrical switches and other controls and designed to control lights, sound, telephone connections, etc.
  3. A flat surface with markings for playing a board game.
    Each player starts the game with four counters on the board.
  4. Short for blackboard, whiteboard, chessboard, surfboard, circuit board, message board (on the Internet), etc.
  5. A committee that manages the business of an organization, e.g., a board of directors.
  6. (uncountable) Regular meals or the amount paid for them in a place of lodging.
  7. (nautical) The side of a ship.
    • Now board to board the rival vessels row.
  8. (nautical) The distance a sailing vessel runs between tacks when working to windward.
  9. (ice hockey, often in the plural) The wall that surrounds an ice hockey rink.
  10. (archaic) A long, narrow table, like that used in a medieval dining hall.
  11. Paper made thick and stiff like a board, for book covers, etc.; pasteboard.
    to bind a book in boards
  12. (video games) A level or stage having a particular layout.
    • 2004, Dan Whitehead, Martyn Carroll, Shaun Bebbington, Future Shocks (in Your Sinclair issue 94)
      The object of the game is to move the smiley face over the preset board, in doing so removing the green squares and ending up at the exit []
  13. (bridge) A container for holding pre-dealt cards that is used to allow multiple sets of players to play the same cards.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ボード (bōdo)
Translations
See also
  • batten
  • beam
  • lath
  • plank
  • pole
  • slab
  • veneer

Verb

board (third-person singular simple present boards, present participle boarding, simple past and past participle boarded)

  1. (transitive) To step or climb onto or otherwise enter a ship, aircraft, train or other conveyance.
    • 1862, Benjamin J. Totten, Naval Text-Book, and Dictionary, for the use of the Midshipmen of the U.S. Navy
      You board an enemy to capture her, and a stranger to receive news or make a communication.
    Antonyms: alight, disembark
  2. (transitive) To provide someone with meals and lodging, usually in exchange for money.
    to board one’s horse at a livery stable
  3. (transitive) To receive meals and lodging in exchange for money.
    • February 8, 1712, Charity Frost, The Spectator No. 296 (letter to the editor)
      We are several of us, gentlemen and ladies, who board in the same house,
  4. (transitive, nautical) To capture an enemy ship by going alongside and grappling her, then invading her with a boarding party
  5. (intransitive) To obtain meals, or meals and lodgings, statedly for compensation
  6. (transitive, now rare) To approach (someone); to make advances to, accost.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iv:
      Ere long with like againe he boorded mee, / Saying, he now had boulted all the floure []
  7. To cover with boards or boarding.
    to board a house
    • the boarded hovel
  8. To hit (someone) with a wooden board.
  9. (transitive) To write something on a board, especially a blackboard or whiteboard.
Translations

Etymology 2

From backboard

Noun

board (plural boards)

  1. (basketball, informal) A rebound.
Translations

Anagrams

  • B road, Bardo, Borda, Broad, Broad., Broda, Dobra, abord, adorb, bardo, broad, dobra

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