Sickle vs Scythe what difference

what is difference between Sickle and Scythe

English

Etymology

From Middle English sikel (also assibilated in sichel), from Old English sicol, siċel, from Proto-Germanic *sikilō (ploughshare), of uncertain origin.
Possibly a borrowing from Latin sēcula (sickle) or sīcīlis (sickle); itself from Proto-Albanian *tsikā, or, alternatively derived as a diminutive of Proto-Germanic *seką (ploughshare), from Proto-Indo-European *seg-, a variant of Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Cognate with West Frisian systel, sisel, sizel (sickle), Dutch sikkel (sickle), German Sichel (sickle). Related also to West Frisian sichte (sickle), Dutch zicht (sickle), German Low German Sichte, Sicht (sickle), German Sech (the blade of a sickle or scythe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪkl̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkəl
  • Hyphenation: sic‧kle

Noun

sickle (plural sickles)

  1. (agriculture) An implement having a semicircular blade and short handle, used for cutting long grass and cereal crops.
  2. Any of the sickle-shaped middle feathers of the domestic cock.

Synonyms

  • reap hook
  • reaping hook

Coordinate terms

  • scythe

Derived terms

  • sickle cell
  • hammer and sickle
  • moonsickle

Translations

Further reading

  • Sickle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

sickle (third-person singular simple present sickles, present participle sickling, simple past and past participle sickled)

  1. (agriculture, transitive) To cut with a sickle.
  2. (transitive) To deform (as with a red blood cell) into an abnormal crescent shape.
  3. (intransitive) Of red blood cells: to assume an abnormal crescent shape.

Derived terms

  • (transitive: to deform): sickler

Translations

Adjective

sickle (comparative more sickle, superlative most sickle)

  1. Shaped like the blade of a sickle; crescent-shaped.

Derived terms

  • sickle cell anaemia, sickle-cell anaemia, sickle-cell anemia

Translations

Anagrams

  • Celiks, Eslick, Ickles, Leicks, ickles


English

Alternative forms

  • (archaic): sithe, sythe
  • (Exmoor dial.): zive

Etymology

From Middle English sythe, sithe, from Old English sīþe, sīġþe, siġdi (sickle), from Proto-Germanic *sigiþaz, *sigiþô, derived from *seg- (saw), from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Germanic cognates include Low German Sicht (scythe), Dutch zicht (sickle), Icelandic sigð (sickle). Related to saw, which see.

The silent c crept in the early 15th century owing to pseudoetymological association with Medieval Latin scissor (tailor, carver), from Latin scindere (to cut, rend, split).

The verb, which was first used in the intransitive sense, is from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsaɪð/, (some accents) IPA(key): /ˈsaɪθ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪð, -aɪθ

Noun

scythe (plural scythes)

  1. An instrument for mowing grass, grain, etc. by hand, composed of a long, curving blade with a sharp concave edge, fastened to a long handle called a snath. [before 10th century]
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 12[1]:
      And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defence
      Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.
  2. (historical) A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.
  3. (cartomancy) The tenth Lenormand card.

Translations

Further reading

  • Scythe on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Scythe in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Verb

scythe (third-person singular simple present scythes, present participle scything, simple past and past participle scythed)

  1. (intransitive) To use a scythe. [from 1570s]
  2. (transitive) To cut with a scythe. [from 1570s]
  3. (transitive) To cut off as with a scythe; to mow. [from 1590s]
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To attack or injure as if cutting.

Derived terms

  • scyther

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Tyches, chesty

French

Etymology

See Scythe (Scythian)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sit/

Adjective

scythe (plural scythes)

  1. Scythian

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