Spasm vs Cramp what difference

what is difference between Spasm and Cramp

English

Etymology

From Middle English spasme, from Old French spasme, from Latin spasmus, from Ancient Greek σπασμός (spasmós, spasm, convulsion), from σπάω (spáō, to draw out, pull out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspæz.əm/

Noun

spasm (plural spasms)

  1. A sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ.
  2. A violent, excruciating seizure of pain.
  3. A sudden and temporary burst of energy, activity, or emotion.

Related terms

  • spastic

Translations

Verb

spasm (third-person singular simple present spasms, present participle spasming, simple past and past participle spasmed)

  1. To produce and undergo a spasm.

Translations

Anagrams

  • samps, spams

Romanian

Etymology

From French spasme.

Noun

spasm n (plural spasme)

  1. spasm

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From Old French spasme, from Latin spasmus, from Ancient Greek σπασμός (spasmós).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspasm/, [ˈspasːm]

Noun

spasm c

  1. spasm

Declension

References

  • spasm in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)


English

Etymology

From Middle English crampe, from Old French crampe (cramp), from Frankish *krampa (cramp), from Proto-Germanic *krampō (cramp, clasp). Distant relative of English crop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɹæmp/
  • Rhymes: -æmp

Noun

cramp (countable and uncountable, plural cramps)

  1. A painful contraction of a muscle which cannot be controlled.
    • August 1534, Margaret Roper (or Thomas More in her name), letter to Alice Alington
      the cramp also that divers nights gripeth him in his legs.
  2. That which confines or contracts.
    Synonyms: restraint, shackle, hindrance
    • 1782, William Cowper, Truth
      crippling his pleasures with the cramp of fear
  3. A clamp for carpentry or masonry.
  4. A piece of wood having a curve corresponding to that of the upper part of the instep, on which the upper leather of a boot is stretched to give it the requisite shape.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

cramp (third-person singular simple present cramps, present participle cramping, simple past and past participle cramped)

  1. (intransitive) (of a muscle) To contract painfully and uncontrollably.
  2. (transitive) To affect with cramps or spasms.
    • 1936, Heinrich Hauser, Once Your Enemy (translated from the German by Norman Gullick)
      The collar of the tunic scratched my neck, the steel helmet made my head ache, and the puttees cramped my leg muscles.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To prohibit movement or expression of.
    • 1853, Austen Henry Layard, Discoveries in the Ruins of Nineveh and Babylon
      But the front of the animal , which was in full , was narrow and cramped , and unequal in dignity to the side
  4. (transitive) To restrain to a specific physical position, as if with a cramp.
    You’re going to need to cramp the wheels on this hill.
    • 1633, John Ford, Perkin Warbeck
      when the gout cramps my joints
  5. To fasten or hold with, or as if with, a cramp iron.
  6. (by extension) To bind together; to unite.
    • 1780, Edmund Burke, Principles in Politics
      The [] fabric of universal justice is well cramped and bolted together in all its parts.
  7. To form on a cramp.

Derived terms

  • cramp someone’s style

Translations

Adjective

cramp (comparative more cramp, superlative most cramp)

  1. (archaic) cramped; narrow

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021) , “cramp”, in Online Etymology Dictionary
  • cramp at OneLook Dictionary Search

Manx

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

cramp

  1. intricate, complex

Derived terms

  • neuchramp

Mutation

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