Specie vs Species what difference

what is difference between Specie and Species

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspiːʃi/

Etymology 1

Originally in the phrase in specie; from Latin speciē, ablative singular of species. Compare payment in kind.

Noun

specie (uncountable)

  1. Type or kind, in various uses of the phrase in specie.
  2. Money, especially in the form of coins made from precious metal, that has an intrinsic value; coinage.
    • 1830, Joseph Plumb Martin, A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Ch. IX:
      I received one month’s pay in specie while on the march to Virginia, in the year 1781, and except that, I never received any pay worth the name while I belonged to the army.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 805:
      ‘It was not money or specie he thought himself hunting!’
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 8:
      “Dick” Counterfly had absquatulated swiftly into the night, leaving his son with only a pocketful of specie and the tender admonition, “Got to ‘scram,’ kid — write if you get work.”
Translations

See also

  • payment in kind

Etymology 2

Back-formation from species (plural), the final “s” being misinterpreted as a plural ending.

Noun

specie (plural species)

  1. (proscribed) singular of species
Usage notes
  • Although in wide use, this is universally considered by prescriptive references to be an error.

Anagrams

  • pieces

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin speciēs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspeː.si/
  • Hyphenation: spe‧cie
  • Rhymes: -eːsi

Noun

specie f (plural speciën or species)

  1. mortar (in sense of mixture of lime or cement, sand and water)
    Synonyms: metselspecie, mortel
  2. coinage, specie, coins
  3. material used in casting

Derived terms

  • metselspecie

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin speciēs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspɛ.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtʃe
  • Hyphenation: spè‧cie

Adverb

specie

  1. especially, particularly

Derived terms

  • fare specie (to amaze, shock)

Noun

specie f (invariable)

  1. kind, type, sort
  2. (biology) species, strain, breed
  3. (taxonomy) species

Related terms

  • cronospecie
  • speciale
  • speciazione
  • specifico

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈspe.ki.eː/, [ˈs̠pɛkieː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈspe.t͡ʃi.e/, [ˈspɛːt͡ʃiɛ]

Noun

speciē

  1. ablative singular of speciēs

Preposition

speciē

  1. Under the pretext of. Under the guise of.

References

  • specie in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin speciēs.

Noun

specie f (plural specii)

  1. (biology) species
  2. kind, type, sort

See also

  • gen
  • tip
  • fel


English

Etymology

From Latin speciēs (appearance; quality), from speciō (see) + -iēs suffix signifying abstract noun. Doublet of spice

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspiːʃiːz/, /ˈspiːsiːz/. Some speakers pronounce the singular with -ɪz, the plural with -iːz.

Noun

species (plural species or (rare, nonstandard) specieses)

  1. Type or kind. (Compare race.)
    • 1871, Richard Holt Hutton, Essays, Theological and Literary
      What is called spiritualism should, I think, be called a mental species of materialism.
    1. A group of plants or animals having similar appearance.
    2. (biology, taxonomy) A category in the classification of organisms, ranking below genus; a taxon at that rank.
      • 1859, Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species:
        Hence, in determining whether a form should be ranked as a species or a variety, the opinion of naturalists having sound judgment and wide experience seems the only guide to follow.
    3. (chemistry, physics) A particular type of atom, molecule, ion or other particle.
    4. (mineralogy) A mineral with a unique chemical formula whose crystals belong to a unique crystallographic system.
  2. An image, an appearance, a spectacle.
    1. (obsolete) The image of something cast on a surface, or reflected from a surface, or refracted through a lens or telescope; a reflection.
    2. Visible or perceptible presentation; appearance; something perceived.
      • Wit, [] the faculty of imagination in the writer, which searches over all the memory for the species or ideas of those things which it designs to represent.
      • the species of the letters illuminated with indigo and violet
    3. A public spectacle or exhibition.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  3. (Christianity) Either of the two elements of the Eucharist after they have been consecrated.
  4. Coin, or coined silver, gold, or other metal, used as a circulating medium; specie.
    • 1727, John Arbuthnot, Tables of Ancient Coins, Weights and Measures
      There was, in the splendour of the Roman empire, a less quantity of current species in Europe than there is now.
  5. A component part of compound medicine; a simple.
  6. An officinal mixture or compound powder of any kind; especially, one used for making an aromatic tea or tisane; a tea mixture.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thomas de Quincey to this entry?)

Usage notes

  • species is its own plural; specie is a separate word that means coin money.
  • (biology, taxonomy): See species name, binomial nomenclature.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • race
  • (taxonomy, rank):
    • domain
    • kingdom
    • phylum/division
    • class
    • order
    • family
    • genus
    • superspecies
    • species
      • subspecies, form
      • (botany, horticulture): variety, cultivar

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “species”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN

Noun

species

  1. plural of specie

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

species

  1. Plural form of specie

Synonyms

  • speciën

Latin

Etymology

From speciō (see) + -iēs suffix signifying abstract noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈspe.ki.eːs/, [ˈs̠pɛkieːs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈspe.t͡ʃi.es/, [ˈspɛːt͡ʃiɛs]

Noun

speciēs f (genitive speciēī); fifth declension

  1. a seeing, view, look
  2. a spectacle, sight
  3. external appearance, looks; general outline or shape
  4. semblance, pretence, pretext, outward show
  5. show, display
  6. (figuratively) vision, dream, apparition
  7. (figuratively) honor, reputation
  8. (figuratively) a kind, quality, type
  9. (law, later) a special case

Declension

Fifth-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • speciātim

Descendants

References

  • species in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • species in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • species in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

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