Stage vs Scene what difference

English

Etymology

From Middle English stage, from Old French estage (dwelling, residence; position, situation, condition), from Old French ester (to be standing, be located). Cognate with Old English stæþþan (to make staid, stay), Old Norse steðja (to place, provide, confirm, allow), Old English stæde, stede (state, status, standing, place, station, site). More at stead.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /steɪd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Noun

stage (plural stages)

  1. A phase.
    • 1986, Daniel Woodrell, Under the Bright Lights p.66
      “They’re bikini briefs”, Nicole said. “That just means sexy underwear.”
      “I though naked was sexy.”
      “Well, it is. But sexy comes in stages“.
  2. (by extension) One of the portions of a device (such as a rocket or thermonuclear weapon) which are used or activated in a particular order, one after another.
  3. (theater) A platform; a surface, generally elevated, upon which show performances or other public events are given.
    • 1829, Charles Sprague, Curiosity
      Lo! Where the stage, the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
    • 1891, Oscar Wilde:, Intentions
      The theater is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, it is also the return of art to life.
  4. A floor or storey of a house.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)
  5. A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  6. A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  7. A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
    • 1711 April 14, Jonathan Swift, letter to Stella
      I went in the sixpenny stage.
    • a parcel sent you by the stage
  8. (dated) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  9. (dated) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
    • 1807, Francis Jeffrey, “Clarkson on Quakerism”, in The Edinburgh Review April 1807
      A stage [] signifies a certain distance on a road.
    • 1858, Samuel Smiles, Robert Stephenson, The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer, p.356
      He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages.
  10. (electronics) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  11. The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  12. (video games) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
    Synonym: level
  13. A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  14. (geology) The succession of rock strata laid down in a single age on the geologic time scale.

Synonyms

  • (phase): tier, level
  • (video games): level, map, area, world, track, board, zone, phase

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ステージ (sutēji)

Translations

Verb

stage (third-person singular simple present stages, present participle staging, simple past and past participle staged)

  1. (transitive) To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  2. To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  3. (transitive) To orchestrate; to carry out.
  4. (transitive) To place in position to prepare for use.
  5. (transitive, medicine) To determine what stage (a disease, etc.) has progressed to
    • 2010, Howard M. Fillit, Kenneth Rockwood, Kenneth Woodhouse, Brocklehurst’s Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology (page 940)
      One method of documenting a wound is as follows: (1) stage the ulcer, time present, setting where occurred; (2) describe the location anatomically; (3) measure ulcer in centimeters (length × width × base); []
  6. (rocketry) To jettison a spent stage of a multistage rocket or other launch vehicle and light the engine(s) of the stage above it.

Derived terms

  • hot-stage

Synonyms

  • (demonstrate in a deceptive manner): fake

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gates, Geats, agest, e-tags, gates, geats, getas

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French stage

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: sta‧ge

Noun

stage m (plural stages, diminutive stagetje n)

  1. probation, induction
  2. apprenticeship
  3. internship

Related terms

  • stagiair

French

Etymology

From Medieval Latin stagium, itself from Old French estage: ester +‎ -age (whence modern French étage). Cognates and borrowings are common in other European languages, including Italian stage, Czech stáž, Dutch stage, Portuguese estágio and Serbo-Croatian staž.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /staʒ/

Noun

stage m (plural stages)

  1. internship, job that a trainee is doing in a workplace until a fixed date
  2. probation, induction

Related terms

  • stagiaire (trainee)

Descendants

References

  • “stage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • gâtes, gâtés

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from French stage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstaʒ/

Noun

stage m (invariable)

  1. internship
    Synonym: tirocinio

Usage notes

  • The noun is often, but incorrectly, pronounced IPA(key): /ˈstejd͡ʒ/ or IPA(key): /ˈstɛjd͡ʒ/ via an erroneous connection to English stage. Sometimes the word is also given the meaning of English “stage” (as in a platform where a performance happens).


Middle English

Etymology

From Old French estage, from ester (to be standing, be located).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

stage (plural stages or stage)

  1. A tier of a structure; a floor or storey:
    1. The topmost story of a building; a rooftop.
    2. A deck (surface of a ship)
    3. A floor of a vehicle or on a mount.
  2. A raised floor; a platform or podium.
    1. A ledge or shelf (projecting storage platform)
    2. A stage; a platform facing the audience.
    3. A box seat; a premium seat for an audience member.
  3. A duration or period; an amount of time.
  4. A stage or phase; a sequential part.
  5. A tier or grade; a place in a hierarchy.
  6. A locale or place; a specified point in space.
  7. Heaven (home of (the Christian) God)
  8. (rare) The cross-beam of a window.
  9. (rare) A seat or chair.
  10. (rare) A state of being.

Derived terms

  • forstage

Descendants

  • English: stage

References

  • “stāǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2020-01-12.


English

Alternative forms

  • scæne (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle French scene, from Latin scaena, scēna, from Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage). Doublet of scena.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sēn, IPA(key): /siːn/
  • Homophone: seen
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Noun

scene (plural scenes)

  1. The location of an event that attracts attention.
  2. (archaic, theater) the stage.
  3. (theater) The decorations; furnishings and backgrounds of a stage, representing the place in which the action of a play is set
  4. (theater, film, television, radio) A part of a dramatic work that is set in the same place or time. In the theatre, generally a number of scenes constitute an act.
  5. The location, time, circumstances, etc., in which something occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is set up
    • c. 1810, John M. Mason, On Religious Controversy
      The world is a vast scene of strife.
  6. A combination of objects or events in view or happening at a given moment at a particular place.
    • Through what new scenes and changes must we pass!
  7. A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.
    • A sylvan scene with various greens was drawn, / Shades on the sides, and in the midst a lawn.
  8. An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others, creating embarrassment or disruption; often, an artificial or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display
    • 1832, Thomas De Quincey, Kolsterheim
      Probably no lover of scenes would have had very long to wait or some explosions between parties, both equally ready to take offence, and careless of giving it.
  9. An element of fiction writing.
  10. A social environment consisting of an informal, vague group of people with a uniting interest; their sphere of activity; a subculture.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • proscenium

Verb

scene (third-person singular simple present scenes, present participle scening, simple past and past participle scened)

  1. (transitive) To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display.

Anagrams

  • cenes, cense, sence

Danish

Etymology

Via Latin scaena from Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seːnə/, [ˈseːnə]
  • Homophone: sene

Noun

scene c (singular definite scenen, plural indefinite scener)

  1. stage (platform for performing in a theatre)
  2. scene (section of a film or a play)
  3. scene (a setting or a behaviour)

Inflection

Derived terms

  • iscenesætte
  • sceneri
  • sceneshow

Italian

Noun

scene f pl

  1. plural of scena

Middle French

Etymology

First known attestation 1486, borrowed from Latin scaena.

Noun

scene f

  1. stage (location where a play, etc., takes place)

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • sene

Etymology

From Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage), via Latin scaena

Noun

scene m (definite singular scenen, indefinite plural scener, definite plural scenene)

  1. a stage (in a theatre)
  2. a scene (in a film or play)

Derived terms

  • iscenesette
  • sceneshow

References

  • “scene” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • sene

Etymology

From Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage), via Latin scaena

Noun

scene m (definite singular scenen, indefinite plural scenar, definite plural scenane)
scene f (definite singular scena, indefinite plural scener, definite plural scenene)

  1. a stage (in a theatre)
  2. a scene (in a film or play)

Derived terms

  • sceneshow

References

  • “scene” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *skaunī, from Proto-Germanic *skauniz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃeː.ne/

Adjective

sċēne

  1. Alternative form of sċīene

Declension


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