Tho vs Though what difference

what is difference between Tho and Though

English

Pronunciation

  • (when stressed)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ðəʊ/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ðoʊ/
    • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • (when unstressed)
    • (West Country) IPA(key): /ðə/
    • Homophone: the

Etymology 1

From Middle English tho, tha, from Old English þā pl (the, those), from Proto-Germanic *þai (those), from Proto-Indo-European *to-, *só (that). Cognate with Saterland Frisian do pl (the).

Article

tho

  1. (obsolete, West Country) The (plural form); those.

Pronoun

tho

  1. (obsolete) Those; they.

Etymology 2

From Middle English tho, tha, from Old English þā (then, when), from Proto-Germanic *þa- (that), from Proto-Indo-European *to-, *só (that). See also German da (then, thereupon).

Adverb

tho (not comparable)

  1. (now dialectal) Then; thereupon.
    • 1481, William Caxton, The History Reynard the Foxː
      Tho went I near and found Master Reynard, that had left that he first read and sang, and began to play his old play.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calenderː Januaryeː
      Tho to a hill his faynting flocke he ledde.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.2:
      Tho, her avizing of the vertues rare / Which thereof spoken were, she gan againe / Her to bethink of that mote to her selfe pertaine.
    • 1642, Henry More, Song Soulː
      Tho I gan closely on his person look.

Conjunction

tho

  1. (dialectal) When.

Etymology 3

Mostly found in American English; alteration of though. Compare tho’.

Adverb

tho (not comparable)

  1. (informal, chiefly US) Alternative spelling of though

Anagrams

  • -oth, HOT, OTH, hot, o’th’, oth

Crimean Gothic

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sa, *sō, *þat.

Article

tho

  1. the
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq
      omnibus vero dictionibus praeponebat articulum tho aut the

      but to all utterances one prefixes the article tho or the

Usage notes

While it is likely that Crimean Gothic retained grammatical gender, de Busbecq’s letter does not mention which articles are used with which words, making it impossible to reconstruct their gender.


Middle English

Article

tho

  1. the
    • c. 1449-1455, Reginald Pecock, Represser of over-much weeting of the Clergie
      sithen if tho thre be sufficiently improued , that is to seie , if it be sufficientli proued that tho thre ben noust and vntrewe and badde

Old Saxon

Adverb

thô

  1. then

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /θoː/

Adverb

tho (not comparable)

  1. though, however

Welsh

Noun

tho

  1. Aspirate mutation of to.

Mutation


English

Alternative forms

  • tho, tho’, thô
  • thogh (obsolete)
  • thot (Scottish, obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English thaugh, thagh, from Old English þēah (though, although, even if, that, however, nevertheless, yet, still; whether), later superseded in many dialects by Middle English though, thogh, from Old Norse *þóh (later þó); both from Proto-Germanic *þauh (though), from Proto-Indo-European *to-, suffixed with Proto-Germanic *-hw < Proto-Indo-European *-kʷe (and).

Akin to Scots thoch (though), Saterland Frisian dach (though), West Frisian dôch, dochs (though), Dutch doch (though), German doch (though), Swedish dock (however, still), Icelandic þó (though). More at that.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: thō, IPA(key): /ðəʊ/
  • (General American) enPR: thō, IPA(key): /ðoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Adverb

though (not comparable)

  1. (conjunctive) Despite that; however.
  2. (degree) Used to intensify statements or questions; indeed.

Synonyms

  • (despite that): all the same, anyhow, anyway, even so, in any case, nevertheless, nonetheless, still, yet; see also Thesaurus:nevertheless

Translations

Conjunction

though

  1. Despite the fact that; although.
  2. (archaic) If, that, even if.
    • 1945, Oscar Hammerstein II, “You’ll Never Walk Alone” (song), in Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, Carousel (musical)
      Walk on through the wind, / Walk on through the rain, / Though your dreams be tossed and blown.

Usage notes

  • (if): This sense is now archaic, except in the fixed expression as though.

Synonyms

  • (although): although, even though; see also Thesaurus:even though

Translations


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