Trek vs Track what difference

what is difference between Trek and Track

English

Alternative forms

  • treck (archaic)

Etymology

From Afrikaans trek, from Dutch trekken, from Middle Dutch trekken (weak verb) and trēken (to trek, place, bring, move, strong verb), from Old Dutch *trekkan, *trekan, from Proto-Germanic *trekaną, *trakjaną (to drag, haul, scrape, pull), from Proto-Indo-European *dreg- (to drag, scrape).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trĕk, IPA(key): /tɹɛk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Noun

trek (plural treks)

  1. (South Africa) A journey by ox wagon.
  2. (South Africa) The Boer migration of 1835-1837.
  3. A slow or difficult journey.
  4. A long walk.
    Synonym: slog

Verb

trek (third-person singular simple present treks, present participle trekking, simple past and past participle trekked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a slow or arduous journey.
    • 1892, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Beach of Falesá
      Before that they had been a good deal on the move, trekking about after the white man, who was one of those rolling stones that keep going round after a soft job.
  2. (intransitive) To journey on foot, especially to hike through mountainous areas.
  3. (South Africa) To travel by ox wagon.

Related terms

  • trigger

Translations

Anagrams

  • rekt

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /træk/

Etymology 1

From Dutch trekken.

Verb

trek (present trek, present participle trekkende, past participle getrek)

  1. to haul
  2. to move (moving house)
  3. to pull

Descendants

  • English: trek

Etymology 2

From Dutch trek.

Noun

trek (plural trekke)

  1. journey
Derived terms
  • Groot Trek

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trɛk/
  • Hyphenation: trek
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch trec, from trecken.

Noun

trek m (plural trekken, diminutive trekje n)

  1. (uncountable) appetite
    Ik heb trek in een reep chocola — I could (now) have a chocolate bar
    Ik heb geen trek in deze klus — I have no mind to carry out this task
  2. (countable) journey, migration
  3. (uncountable) animal migration
  4. (uncountable) draught, air current through a chimney.
  5. (countable) feature, trait

Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

trek

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trekken
  2. imperative of trekken

Anagrams

  • rekt

French

Noun

trek m (plural treks)

  1. treck
  2. trecking

Ternate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɾek]

Noun

trek

  1. truck

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh, page 30


English

Etymology

From Middle English trak, tracke, from Old French trac (track of horses, trail, trace), of uncertain origin. Likely from a Germanic source, either Old Norse traðk (“a track; path; trodden spot”; > Icelandic traðk (a track; path; tread), Faroese traðk (track; tracks), Norwegian tråkke (to trample)) or from Middle Dutch trec, *trac, treck (“line, row, series”; > Dutch trek (a draft; feature; trait; groove; expedition)), German Low German Treck (a draught; movement; passage; flow). See tread, trek.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trăk, IPA(key): /tɹæk/
  • Rhymes: -æk

Noun

track (plural tracks)

  1. A mark left by something that has passed along.
    Synonyms: trace, trail, wake
  2. A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or animal.
    Synonyms: footprint, impression
  3. The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.
  4. A road or other similar beaten path.
    Synonyms: path, road, way
  5. Physical course; way.
    Synonyms: course, path, trajectory, way
  6. A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.
    Synonyms: course, racetrack
  7. The direction and progress of someone or something; path.
  8. (railways) The way or rails along which a train moves.
    Synonyms: rails, railway, train tracks, tracks
  9. A tract or area, such as of land.
    Synonyms: area, parcel, region, tract
  10. (slang) The street, as a prostitute’s place of work.
    • 2012, Pimpin’ Ken, PIMPOLOGY: The 48 Laws of the Game (page 11)
      A real pimp is a gentleman, but these are pimps in gorilla suits. They hang around pimps, they have hoes on the track working for them, they may even look like pimps, but they are straight simps.
    • 2012, Paul D. Jones, Twilight Nights: The Trials and Tribulations of the Game (page 130)
      After putting Tonya Down on the track, we headed to this club called the Players Club.
  11. Awareness of something, especially when arising from close monitoring.
  12. (automotive) The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree.
    Synonym: track width
  13. (automotive) Short for caterpillar track.
  14. (cricket) The pitch.
    Synonyms: ground, pitch
  15. Sound stored on a record.
    Synonym: recording
  16. The physical track on a record.
    Synonym: groove
  17. (music) A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence.
  18. A circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.
  19. (uncountable, sports) The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.
    Synonyms: athletics, track and field
    • 1973, University of Virginia Undergraduate Record
      The University of Virginia belongs to the Atlantic Coast Conference and competes interscholastically in basketball, baseball, crew, cross country, fencing, football, golf, indoor track, lacrosse, polo, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, and wrestling.
  20. A themed set of talks within a conference.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • (distance between two opposite wheels): wheelbase: the distance between the front and rear axles of a vehicle.
  • Translations

    See also

    • path
    • trail

    Verb

    track (third-person singular simple present tracks, present participle tracking, simple past and past participle tracked)

    1. To continue over time.
      1. (transitive) To observe the (measured) state of a person or object over time.
        We will track the raven population over the next six months.
      2. (transitive) To monitor the movement of a person or object.
        Agent Miles has been tracking the terrorist since Madrid.
      3. (transitive) To match the movement or change of a person or object.
        My height tracks my father’s at my age, so I might end up as tall as him.
      4. (transitive or intransitive, of a camera) To travel so that a moving object remains in shot.
        The camera tracked the ball even as the field of play moved back and forth, keeping the action in shot the entire time.
      5. (intransitive, chiefly of a storm) To move.
        The hurricane tracked further west than expected.
      6. (transitive) To traverse; to move across.
        • 1837, Elizabeth Parker, Popular Poems. Selected by E. P. (page 228)
          I’ve swept o’er the mountain, the forest and fell, / I’ve played on the rock where the wild chamois dwell; / I have tracked the desert so dreary and rude, / Through the pathless depths of its solitude; []
      7. (transitive) To tow.
      8. (intransitive) To exhibit good cognitive function.
        Is the patient tracking? Does he know where he is?
        • 2004, Catherine Anderson, Blue Skies, Penguin (→ISBN), page 39:
          Bess already knew about the painkillers and alcohol not mixing well…. “I wasn’t tracking very well.”
        • 2010 October 1, “karimitch” (username), “Memory Loss – Pancreatic Cancer Forums”, in cancerforums.net, Cancer Forums:
          My mother in the past couple of days has started to really get confused and lose her train of thought easily…. She isn’t tracking very well.
    2. (transitive) To follow the tracks of.
      My uncle spent all day tracking the deer, whose hoofprints were clear in the mud.
      1. (transitive) To discover the location of a person or object by following traces.
        I tracked Joe to his friend’s bedroom, where he had spent the night.
        • 2017 August 25, Aukkarapon Niyomyat & Panarat Thepgumpanat, “Thai junta seeks Yingluck’s arrest as former PM skips court verdict”, in reuters.com, Reuters:
          “She could be at any hospital…she could be ill. It’s not clear whether she has fled,” he told reporters. “Yingluck has many homes and many cars. It is difficult to track her.”
      2. (transitive) To leave in the form of tracks.
        In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house.
    3. (transitive) To make tracks on.
    4. (transitive or intransitive) To create a musical recording (a track).
      Lil Kyle is gonna track with that DJ next week.
      1. (computing, transitive or intransitive) To create music using tracker software.
        • 2018, Dafni Tragaki, Made in Greece: Studies in Popular Music
          At the time, tracking chiptunes (i.e. using trackers) was the fundamental method of chipmusic-making.
    5. (intransitive, colloquial) To make sense; to be consistent with known information

    Synonyms

    • (observe the state of an object over time): monitor
    • (monitor the movement of a person or object): follow
    • (discover the location of a person or object): find, locate, trace, track down
    • (be consistent with known information): make sense, check out

    Derived terms

    • track down
    • track with
    • tracking shot

    Related terms

    • tracker

    Translations


    Spanish

    Etymology

    From English track.

    Noun

    track m (plural tracks)

    1. (sports) track

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