Verse vs Stanza what difference

what is difference between Verse and Stanza

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈvɝs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈvɜːs/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English vers, from a mixture of Old English fers and Old French vers; both from Latin versus (a line in writing, and in poetry a verse; (originally) row, furrow), from vertō (to turn around).

Noun

verse (countable and uncountable, plural verses)

  1. A poetic form with regular meter and a fixed rhyme scheme.
    Synonym: poetry
  2. Poetic form in general.
  3. One of several similar units of a song, consisting of several lines, generally rhymed.
    Synonym: stanza
  4. A small section of the Jewish or Christian Bible.
    Holonym: chapter
  5. (music) A portion of an anthem to be performed by a single voice to each part.
Derived terms
  • blank verse
  • free verse
Related terms
  • versification
  • versify
Translations

Verb

verse (third-person singular simple present verses, present participle versing, simple past and past participle versed)

  1. (obsolete) To compose verses.
    • c. 1579, Philip Sidney, The Defense of Poesy
      It is not rhyming and versing that maketh a poet.
  2. (transitive) To tell in verse, or poetry.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) to educate about, to teach about.

Etymology 2

Back-formation from versus, misconstrued as a third-person singular verb verses.

Verb

verse (third-person singular simple present verses, present participle versing, simple past and past participle versed)

  1. (colloquial, sometimes proscribed) To oppose, to compete against, especially in a video game.

Further reading

  • verse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • verse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • verse at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • reves, serve, sever, veers

Afrikaans

Noun

verse

  1. plural of vers

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

verse

  1. Inflected form of vers

Anagrams

  • vrees

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɛʁs/

Adjective

verse (plural verses)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Noun

verse f (plural verses)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived terms

  • pleuvoir à verse

Verb

verse

  1. inflection of verser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

  • resve, rêves, rêvés, serve

Hungarian

Etymology

vers +‎ -e (possessive suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈvɛrʃɛ]
  • Hyphenation: ver‧se

Noun

verse

  1. third-person singular single-possession possessive of vers

Declension


Latin

Participle

verse

  1. vocative masculine singular of versus

Middle English

Noun

verse

  1. Alternative form of vers

Portuguese

Verb

verse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of versar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of versar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of versar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of versar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈverse]

Verb

verse

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of vărsa
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of vărsa

Spanish

Verb

verse (first-person singular present me veo, first-person singular preterite me vi, past participle visto)

  1. to meet; to see one another

Conjugation

Related terms

  • ver

Verb

verse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of versar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of versar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of versar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of versar.


English

Etymology

From Italian stanza, from Vulgar Latin *stantia (standing, stopping-place), from Latin stāns, stantis, from stō, stāre, from Proto-Italic *staēō, from Proto-Indo-European *sth₂éh₁yeti, stative verb from *steh₂- (whence English stand). Doublet of stance.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstænzə/
  • Rhymes: -ænzə

Noun

stanza (plural stanzas)

  1. A unit of a poem, written or printed as a paragraph; equivalent to a verse.
  2. (architecture) An apartment or division in a building.
  3. (computing) An XML element which acts as basic unit of meaning in XMPP.
    • 2011, P. Saint-Andre, RFC 6120 – Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP): Core
      Definition of XML Stanza: An XML stanza is the basic unit of meaning in XMPP.
    • 2009, Tim Riley, Adam Goucher, Beautiful Testing: Leading Professionals Reveal How They Improve Software
      Whenever an XMPP client generates an XML stanza, it typically constructs the XML of the stanza by building up a structured document []
    • 2009, John Rittinghouse, James F. Ransome, Cloud Computing: Implementation, Management, and Security
      Technically speaking, federation is the ability for two XMPP servers in different domains to exchange XML stanzas.
  4. (broadcasting) A segment; a portion of a broadcast devoted to a particular topic.
  5. (sports) A period; an interval into which a sporting event is divided.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • stance
  • stand

Translations

See also

  • strophe

Anagrams

  • ansatz

Italian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *stantia (standing, stopping-place), from Latin stāns, stantis, from stō, stāre.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -antsa
  • IPA(key): /ˈstanːtsa/

Noun

stanza f (plural stanze)

  1. room
  2. stanza

Descendants

  • Old French: estance
    • Middle English: staunce
      • English: stance

Middle Norwegian

Etymology

Related to Old Norse standa.

Verb

stanza

  1. to stop

Descendants

  • Norwegian Nynorsk: stanse

References

  • “stanza” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Sutsilvan) stànza
  • (Puter) staunza

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *stantia (standing, stopping-place), from Latin stāns, stantis, from stō, stāre, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Noun

stanza f (plural stanzas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) room

Synonyms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) chombra
  • (Sursilvan) combra
  • (Surmiran) tgombra

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